Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale


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Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale

(WAIS): see psychological testspsychological test,
any of a variety of testing procedures for measuring psychological traits and behavior, or for studying some specialized aspect of ability. Several forms of testing have arisen from the need to understand personality and its relationship to psychological
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III) was administered in full (14 subtests) and the option for the WAIS-III was based on its specific abilities concerning the intelligence construct.
The study evaluated 138 adults (aged 21-29 years) with sickle cell disease and 37 controls, using a variety of cognitive tests, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III), the Wechsler Memory Scales (WMS-III), the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement, the Test of Everyday Attention (TEA), and the WAIS Processing Speed Index, which assesses attention and the ability to plan and coordinate visual information and motor activities.
NET = neurocognitive enhancement therapy, SD = standard deviation, WAIS = Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, WT = work therapy.
In the 1950s, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - regarded as the godfather (or should that be godmother) of these kinds of tests, men generally did better than women.
For psychologists and graduate students, Kaufman (psychology, Yale University School of Medicine) and Lichtenberg, a clinical psychologist, offer intelligence analysis methods through an introduction to assessment, and describe demographics-based differences, application and interpretation of the WAIS (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), and other measures of intelligence.
The deviation score determined how far above or below the mean (or point of average intelligence) the person tested was, and this measurement method is used today, with results expressed in "standard deviations from the mean." In 1949, Wechsler produced the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), and in 1955, he produced a revision of the adult scales named the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS).
Participants in the study were asked to perform the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) test after educational attainment was assessed through a questionnaire.