Wehrmacht


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Wehrmacht

 

the name for the armed forces of fascist Germany from 1935 to 1945. The basis for the creation and development of the Wehrmacht was the Reichswehr, renamed Wehrmacht after the introduction of universal compulsory military service on Mar. 16, 1935. The Wehrmacht was headed by the Supreme High Command (OKW), to which were subordinated the land forces (das Heer),the air force (die Luftwaffe), and the navy (die Kriegsmarine). At the heads of these forces were high commands (OKH, OKL, OKM, and, from 1940, the SS forces) and the corresponding service commanders in chief. The supreme commander in chief of the Wehrmacht was Chancellor A. Hitler. On the eve of World War II, the Wehrmacht numbered about 3 million men. Its maximum strength was about 11 million men (December 1943).

References in periodicals archive ?
Though impressed by the Wehrmacht that Nazi Germany had produced by 1939, Muller sees the seeds of Germany's defeat in its early successes.
The Wehrmacht sent additional divisions to Italy and occupied strategic positions on the peninsula.
La Wehrmacht encargo entonces 35 millones de pastillas de Pervitin, tambien conocidas como pervitinas, a los laboratorios Temmler para los ejercitos de Tierra y del Aire.
They will act in the same manner as the Wehrmacht officers during World War II.
Hitler, a corporal in the German Army in WW1 who won the Iron Cross for bravery, became Reich Chancellor and Fuhrer within 13 years and commander in chief of the Wehrmacht. But he was never the 'supreme commander of the Armed Forces in WW2'.
Roman Toppel and Peter Lieb compare the deployment of Waffen-SS and Wehrmacht formations at Kursk and in Normandy, respectively, concluding that the combat value of SS forces measured up to that of army units in the second half of the war, and that the SS had a stronger inclination towards committing war crimes.
The largest of the three parts in Path of Thorns, this section begins with a brief description of Mennonite life in Soviet Ukraine in the 1920s and early 1930s, but much of the focus is on the travails of Neufeld and his family in the late 1930s and 1940s, including the following: the difficulties of life in a Molochna kolkhoz in 1939-1940; the impact of the German Wehrmacht's invasion of eastern Ukraine in 1941; the depredations of the N.K.V.D.
The ceremony in Vienna was attended by municipal dignitaries and some of those who had deserted the Wehrmacht.
Because the Wehrmacht resented the formation of the Waffen-SS, it blocked SS authorities from ordering new small arms at the beginning of the war.
On July 20, 1944, a group of Wehrmacht officers led by Stauffenberg tried to kill Hitler by leaving a bomb in one of his headquarters, known as the "Wolfsschanze" (Wolf's Lair).
Service in the "total institution" of the Wehrmacht "established[ed] a specific form of socialization, in which group norms and responsibilities ha[d] far more influence on individuals than under normal social conditions" (16).
Hitler was convinced the Wehrmacht and Luftwaffe would crush the Soviet Union in a matter of six to eight weeks.