weight training

(redirected from Weight-training)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

weight training

physical exercise involving lifting weights to improve muscle performance
References in periodicals archive ?
Weight-training during fasting hours can create too much muscle breakdown and loss of lean mass, and can cause a significant rise in the catabolic hormone cortisol and may lead to dehydration.
This was an unexpected finding of the study and points to a synergistic effect on recovery when using an interval weight-training approach.
It's also effective for people who already have a regular weight-training routine, says Jason Hand, a master's candidate in human physiology at the University of Oregon.
Each year as part of Gallup's November Health and Healthcare survey, Gallup asks Americans to say how frequently they participate in "moderate sports or recreational activities," "vigorous sports or exercise activities," and "weight-lifting or weight-training." The percentages reporting regular participation in each -- defined as three or more times weekly -- has shown little meaningful year-to-year variation, and essentially no change since the baseline year of 2001 for moderate and vigorous exercise, and since 2002 for weight training.
The key benefit of a weight-training programme lies in its ability to help change the composition of our body.
Women in the two-year weight-training program experienced a 7 percent increase in intra-abdominal fat compared to a 21 percent increase in intra-abdominal fat among controls.
She begins by explicating the rise of weightlifting machines and weight-training programs developed by Dudley Allen Sargent and Gustav Zander, designed to "balance" the body through uniform and symmetrical muscular development and to "unblock" energy trapped within the body.
All women entered an 8-week weight-training program of two sessions per week.
Baum reported on 31 healthy but physically unfit 20- to 45-year-olds, including 8 women, who completed a Nautilus weight-training program involving two or three 30- to 40-minute sessions per week for 6 months.
What the introduction of weight-training would do to the body mass and strength of the throwers in the field events.
Women may benefit greatly from engaging in weight-training programs (e.g., improved body image, reduced risk of osteoporosis; see Layne & Nelson, 1999; Williams & Cash, 2001), yet many are still reluctant to lift weight for fear of becoming "too masculine." Therefore, it is important to determine interventions that can improve adherence to weight training in this group.