Weissenberg effect


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Weissenberg effect

[′vīs·ən‚bərg i‚fekt]
(fluid mechanics)
An alteration of the normal stresses in a non-Newtonian fluid on account of elasticity, so that such a fluid, when placed between two concentric, rotating cylinders, can rise on the inner cylinder in spite of centrifugal forces.
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We used a Brookfield DV II+ Pro-LV plate and cone viscometer, although at higher shear rates the Weissenberg effect was a limitation.
At higher shear rates, the Weissenberg effect was a limitation.
When adding 95% PPD, i.e., 3.287 g, Weissenberg effect became aggravated due to high molecular weight at the final stage.
Weissenberg effect is characteristic of some non-Newtonian fluids such as liquid polymers' solutions.
On the emergence of Weissenberg effect, the gel was stirred manually for one and a half hours.
The result of a non-zero first normal stress difference during mixing of liquid polymer is a formation of a rod climbing known as Weissenberg effect, which was observed during mixing of both CMC solutions.
This axial force is what gives rise to the Weissenberg effect described earlier.
In addition, the material transport along the rotor shafts due to the Weissenberg effect increases the load of the dust stops.
Furthermore, the material transport caused by the Weissenberg effect can be reduced.
When the temperature is lower than 40[degrees]C, the steady shear measurement could not be performed because of Weissenberg effect (rod-climbing), which is one of the most important phenomena exhibited by certain viscoelastic fluids (41), (42).
The monomer concentrations of acrylamide and other vinyl monomers were limited at low level because of Weissenberg effect and stabilization demand [13].