Well Interference

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Well Interference

 

interaction of operating oil, gas, or water wells drilled from the surface to one productive stratum or to two different but hydrodynamically connected strata.

Well interference is caused by the fact that oil, gas, and water are mobile and the pores of the productive strata that contain them are joined into a single system of pore canals and cracks. Thus, wells drawing the same product “hinder” one another by intercepting fluid (or gas) flowing toward them. As a result the yield of each of several operating wells is always less than the yield of a single well, other things being equal. This fact determines a theoretical characteristic of exploiting deposits of liquid (or gaseous) minerals: all operating oil (gas or water) wells are considered in the aggregate only, in their interaction with each other in the overall technological process of being exploited. The laws of well interference are studied by a special science of filtration, underground gas hydrodynamics.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Core is uniquely positioned to provide technology-driven data to determine optimal well spacing and upsizing to all but eliminate the deleterious effects of horizontal well interference. Detailed analysis of core and fluid samples provide information to the operator on micro-lithologies, rock competence, rock mechanics, crude oil types and qualities, all data necessary to determine optimal well spacing and well positioning.
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Well interference is caused by the pumping of high-capacity wells near shallower low-capacity wells.
This module delineates time-related capture zones, and when multiple wells are involved it accounts for well interference.
This solution does not account for well interference.
The RESSQC ten-year TOT solution [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED] results in slightly wider WHPAs than in MWCAP because RESSQC takes into consideration well interference. In RESSQC, however, the downgradient boundary of the capture zone is defined by pathlines, and the solution is not one smooth curve.
The MWCAP steady state solution, shown in Figure 3, does not account for well interference. Well interference is not a main factor affecting the WHPA size for many of Rhode Island's municipal well-fields, because not all wells in a wellfield are pumped simultaneously.