Wernicke's aphasia


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Related to Wernicke's aphasia: Broca's aphasia, conduction aphasia, Wernicke's area

Wernicke's aphasia

[¦ver·ni·kēz ə′fāzh·ə]
(psychology)
Fluent aphasia associated with injury to the area of the left temporal lobe just posterior to the primary auditory complex that is characterized by severely impaired auditory comprehension, and fluent but markedly paraphasic speech, sometimes at faster than normal rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speed of lexical activation in nonfluent Broca's aphasia and fluent Wernicke's aphasia. Brain and Language 59(3): 391-411 http://doi.org/10.1006/brln.1997.1751
Phonological and semantic processing during comprehension in Wernicke's aphasia: An N400 and Phonological Mapping Negativity Study.
These diverse aphasia syndromes (such as Broca's aphasia, conduction aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia, anomic aphasia, and transcortical sensory aphasia) are further regarded as the disturbance of a specific language ability: phoneme recognition, morphosyntax, repetition, and so forth.
When speaking of nonfluent and fluent aphasia, most researchers still mean Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia. In the everyday clinical setting, where clients are not preselected, many are not so easily classifiable as to fluency.
These include, for example, failure to account for the wide range of lesion-deficit patterns observed in aphasia (e.g., when a lesion to a certain area does not necessarily result in a predictable behavioral profile, or when lesions to multiple regions result in behavioral patterns that would otherwise be predicted for a different area altogether) or an inability to explain changes in behavioral patterns observed in aphasia over time (e.g., when a person first diagnosed with Wernicke's aphasia presents later, in the chronic stage, with conduction-like behavioral patterns and/or anomic-like patterns).
In complete occlusion symptoms include contralateral gaze palsy, hemiplegia, hemisensory loss, spatial neglect and homonymous hemianopia.[4,8] Global aphasia is present with left hemisphere lesions.[4] Occlusion of the superior trunk of the middle cerebral artery will result in the following symptoms: contralateral hemiplegia and hemianesthesia in the face and arm with lesser involvement of the lower extremity, ipsilateral deviation of eyes and head, and Broca's aphasia (with dominant hemisphere occlusion).[4,8] Occlusion of the inferior trunk of the middle cerebral artery usually results in contralateral hemianopsia or upper quadrantanopia, Wernicke's aphasia (usually with left sided lesions) and left visual neglect (usually with right sided lesions).
T was diagnosed with Wernicke's aphasia in L1, with a total aphasia quotient of 46.6 (out of 100).