Western blotting

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Western blotting

[′wes·tərn ‚bläd·iŋ]
(cell and molecular biology)
A protein detection technique in which proteins are separated by one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, transferred (blotted) to a nitrocellulose sheet, and then treated with radioactive antibodies (or antibodies coupled to a fluorescent dye or an easily detectable enzyme) that are specific to the protein of interest.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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When the Bartonella IgXSpot test is combined with Bartonella Western Blots, FISH and PCR testing, one can obtain information on the full spectrum of the patient's immune response to the infection and stage of the disease.
He and his team reviewed 60 cases of acute, isolated monoarthritis culled from more than 700 children who presented with joint complaints from 2011 to 2016; 47 had Lyme arthritis confirmed by western blot; 13 had septic arthritis.
Western blot analysis by using tumor lysates showed that silenced PPAR[alpha] reduced LC3-II levels and increased Bcl2 protein levels (Figure 4(c)).
In order to evaluate whether NP cells also express the PPAR[gamma] and the role of high glucose on PPAR[gamma] expression, Real-Time PCR and western blot were used.
To induce the formation of OxiDJ-1 in cells, HEK293T cells were treated with [H.sub.2][O.sub.2] for the indicated times and OxiDJ-1 levels of both the cell lysates and culture media were measured by both Western blot and ELISA.
Since all other targeted peptides are found in high abundance, in view of the Western blot results (Fig.
HA-pSG5-HBD was transfected with Lipo2000 reagent for 72 h in HeLa cells and evaluated by Western blot analysis.
(a) Western Blot analysis of the protein level of Nrf2, MRP2, and Sestrin2 in RE treated HepG2 cells.
Bennett, who heads the Retrovirology Unit of the Florida Bureau of Public Health Laboratories (FBPHL) in Jacksonville, noticed that more specimens were producing repeatedly reactive results on initial screening but negative or indeterminate results on the Western blot. A fair number of those specimens came from people with high-risk lifestyles, such as men having unprotected sex with men, or IV drug abusers.
McCleary claims the Western blot test is faulty because the CDC is not using two "most Lyme specific'' bands (31 kDa and 34 kDa) in its test.
SpeedBlot (His) is equally suitable for Western Blot assays and Dot or Slot Blot assays.