Vestfold

(redirected from Westfold)

Vestfold

(vĕst`fôl'), county (1995 pop. 203,231), c.900 sq mi (2,330 sq km), SE Norway, bordering on the Skagerrak in the south and on the Oslofjord in the east. Tønsberg is the capital. Farming, shipping, and fishing are the chief occupations, with much of the Norwegian merchant marine registered at Vestfold ports, notably Tønsberg, Sandefjord, and Larvik.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vestfold

 

an oasis of the Ingrid Christensen Coast of Antarctica, between 68°25’-68°40’ S. lat. and 77°53’-78°36’. long. With an area of 400 sq km, it consists of small rises with depressions between them, filled with relict salt lakes.

Vestfold was discovered in 1935 by K. Mikkelsen, captain of the Norwegian whaling ship Thorshavn. It was named in honor of one of the provinces of Norway. Since January 1957 it has been the site of the Australian Davis scientific station.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Burstein, M.; McDermott, D.; Smith, D.; and Westfold, S.
Big Jag was the fifth of them; the only other to achieve even modest distinction was the first, a Flying Paster filly called Westfold Vale who won a minor stakes event as a five-year-old.
Westfold, `An Australian Prayer Book 1978 Some Dissentient Thoughts', St Mark's Review, June 1971, pp.
One of the most impressive is the work of Doug Smith and his colleagues at the Kestrel Institute in generating schedulers using a software generation technology (Smith, Parra, and Westfold 1996).
The automatically-synthesized KTS (Kestrel Transportation Scheduler) software has proven startlingly efficient in large-scale scheduling applications (Smith, Parra, and Westfold 1996), and knowledge-based planning and scheduling systems now yield dramatic improvements in manufacturing efficiency and productivity (Naj 1996).