whaler

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whaler

1. a person employed in whaling
2. a vessel engaged in whaling
3. Austral a nomad surviving in the bush without working
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

whaler

[′wāl·ər]
(civil engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wale, waler, whaler

A horizontal timber or beam used to brace or support an upright member, as sheeting, formwork for concrete, etc. (See illustration p. 1052.)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Between the time of his birth in New York City and his return there to research and write his masterpiece, Melville had circled the globe of experience--working as a bank messenger, salesman, farmhand, schoolteacher (like his narrator, Ishmael), engineer and surveyor, bowling alley attendant, cabin boy, and whaleman in the Pacific on the Acushnet.
Duncan, from Devon, got his Whaleman tag after taking his photos into schools.
I care not to perform this part of my task methodically; but shall be content to produce the desired impression by separate citations of items, practically or reliably known to me as a whaleman; and from these citations, I take it--the conclusion aimed at will naturally follow of itself.
I suppose then, that going plump on a flying whale with your sail set in a foggy squall is the height of a whaleman's discretion?"
People wishing to enjoy the San Ignacio Lagoon whalewatching experience should contact Jeff Pantukoff, Whaleman Foundation, PO Box3291, Dana Point, CA 92629.
"In 2000 I started taking my photos, artwork and adventure tales into schools on both sides of the Atlantic and became known as the Whaleman."
I shall ere long paint to you as well as one can without canvas, something like the true form of the whale as he actually appears to the eye of the whaleman when in his own absolute body the whale is moored alongside the whale-ship so that he can be fairly stepped upon there.
In 1853 one whaleman wrote: "The crop of 'whale feed' in the northern seas is sometimes diminished, and sometimes entirely destroyed.
Let not the modern paintings of this scene mislead us; for though the creature encountered by that valiant whaleman of old is vaguely represented of a griffin-like shape, and though the battle is depicted on land and the saint on horseback, yet considering the great ignorance of those times, when the true form of the whale was unknown to artists; and considering that as in Perseus' case, St.
But the whaleman, as he seeks the food of light, so he lives in light.
Humphrey Hughes, a Long Island whaleman who immigrated to Cape May County about 1689, sold his land, which had been owned jointly with another whaler, in about 1700 (Williamson, 1951).
But to render this acuteness at all successful in the end, the wind and the sea must be the whaleman's allies; for of what present avail to the becalmed or windbound mariner is the skill that assures him he is exactly ninety-three leagues and a quarter from his port?