whaler

(redirected from Whalers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

whaler

1. a person employed in whaling
2. a vessel engaged in whaling
3. Austral a nomad surviving in the bush without working

whaler

[′wāl·ər]
(civil engineering)

wale, waler, whaler

A horizontal timber or beam used to brace or support an upright member, as sheeting, formwork for concrete, etc. (See illustration p. 1052.)
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, if the baleen population had been driven as low as 220,200, whalers could lave taken as many as 10,400 baleens each year without jeopardizing the population.
IAIN BUIST || Isaac Robinson from Monkseaton, who found a drawing pin in his chips, bought from The Whitley Whaler. Right, the offending chip
"People have hunted whales for more than 400 years in my hometown." One whaler said before setting off: "I'm a bit nervous but happy that we can start whaling.
The whalers would spend weeks and months hunting their prey.
In the first chapter, the author delineates whalers' attempts to adjust to Arctic life through aspects of Inuit-Qallunaat interaction around the six seasons: aujaq (summer); ukiaksaaq (early fall); ukiak (late fall); ukiuq (winter); upingaksaaq (early spring); and upingaaq (spring).
While conservationists criticise Japan's move, whalers' scope of operation would be much smaller than previous hunts and would save hundreds of whales that Japan used to catch in distant seas.
Aho, a 21-year-old who was born three months after the Whalers' final game, had his fourth career 4-point night and his second in five games, while it was the third for his linemate Teravainen.
Dorsey recounts a history in which the bulk of industrial whalers proved so resistant to any form of meaningful regulation that they opened the door for environmentalists in the 1970s to declare any form of whaling--sustainable or not--immoral, with the public (outside of a few determined whaling nations) generally agreeing.
At 19, Mary Davidson is the oldest daughter of the community's lead whaler. Responsible for the care of her five motherless siblings, she is also the cook and laundress for her father's crew and old enough to understand what the use of kerosene over whale oil might mean to the family finances.
The team searched a 30-mile area of coastline near Wainwright, Alaska, also found 19th century anchors, fasteners and pots whalers once used to render whale blubber into oil, ABC News reported.
Ice fronts were far more advanced around the Arctic during the early 19th century than they are today, according to a new analysis of whalers' log books.