When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd


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When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d

Whitman poem mourns the death of Lincoln. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 1085]
See: Grief
References in periodicals archive ?
Whitman's most moving tribute to Lincoln, however, is the elegiac "When Lilacs Last In the Dooryard Bloom'd." The opening lines provide the important symbols Whitman associates with the fallen president:
Strauss's impassioned samplings from "Song of Myself" and "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd" are arresting.
The professor says Whitman was a great influence on Eliot and calls "The Waste Land," "a revision of Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd."
The one scene in which the production does blossom comes via the music of poetry: Jewish Sam Kaplan (Thomas Sadoski) quotes Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd" to gentile Rose Maurrant (Mary Catherine Garrison), the gift he loves.
When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd Elegy in free verse by Whitman, Walt mourning the death of President Abraham Lincoln.
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