Whig

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Whig

Whig, English political party. The name, originally a term of abuse first used for Scottish Presbyterians in the 17th cent., seems to have been a shortened form of whiggamor [cattle driver]. It was applied (c.1679) to the English opponents of the succession of the Roman Catholic duke of York (later James II), a group led by the 1st earl of Shaftesbury. The Glorious Revolution of 1688, in which the Whigs were joined by many Tories (see Tory), assured a Protestant succession and the constitutional supremacy of Parliament over the king. Political parties during the 18th cent. were essentially groups of factions allied on specific issues. After the accession of William III advocacy of a constitutional monarchy no longer distinguished the Whigs, and during the reign of Queen Anne they became identified increasingly with aristocratic large landholders and the wealthy merchant interests. Under George I and George II most governments were composed of those with aristocratic connections, loosely Whig. The disgrace of Anne's Tory ministers who negotiated for the return of James II on her death, and the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745 stigmatized the Tories as supporters of absolute monarchy, and the Whig ministries of Robert Walpole and Henry Pelham dominated the period. After the accession (1760) of George III there were at first no real issues around which parties could polarize, but a Whig party gradually emerged, united largely in opposition to William Pitt, under the leadership of Charles James Fox. This party became identified with dissent, industrial interests, and social and parliamentary reform, and also with the Prince Regent, later George IV. Whig ministries under the 2d Earl Grey and Lord Melbourne were in power from 1830 to 1841, passing the first parliamentary reform bill. After this the Whigs became a part of the rising Liberal party, in which they constituted the conservative element.

Bibliography

See B. Williams, The Whig Supremacy (2d ed. 1962).

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Whig

1. a member of the English political party or grouping that in 1679--80 opposed the succession to the throne of James, Duke of York (1633--1701; king of England and Ireland as James II, and of Scotland as James VII, 1685--88), on the grounds that he was a Catholic. Standing for a limited monarchy, the Whigs represented the great aristocracy and the moneyed middle class for the next 80 years. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries the Whigs represented the desires of industrialists and Dissenters for political and social reform. The Whigs provided the core of the Liberal Party
2. (in the US) a supporter of the War of American Independence
3. a member of the American political party that opposed the Democrats from about 1834 to 1855 and represented propertied and professional interests
4. a conservative member of the Liberal Party in Great Britain
5. a person who advocates and believes in an unrestricted laissez-faire economy
6. History a 17th-century Scottish Presbyterian, esp one in rebellion against the Crown
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Whiggery is one thing, the guillotine is something else.
Nor is it easy to see how Burke reconciles such sentiments with his commitment to Whiggery with its apotheosis of the so-called Glorious Revolution of 1688, which, ironically, justified itself by charging James II with breaking the original contract between king and people!
Whether or not Butterfield employed the same method in each case--either by interpreting the past in light of present realities, or interpreting past events on their own terms--is open to debate; his identification with political Whiggery is not.
Zakaria's economic Whiggery shapes his assessment of China, "the challenger" in the new global order.
But as Bentley points out, the suppression of whiggery in its various forms by the modernists took several decades, and there are late examples of it cropping up all the way to World War II--Trevelyan survived until 1962.
Equally, in the more familiar terrain, such as Castle Rackrent, the insights and interpolations are consistently valuable and fresh, locating Edgeworth in the complex historical hinterland of rebellion and union, and the fate of the aristocratic paternalistic Whiggery of her father and his ilk.
But his attempt to adopt the public masculinity of Whiggery, in which the political and personal are strictly separated, is equally unsuccessful.
As Protestant warrior queen and militant protectress of international Calvinism, she dominates the oppositional discourses of the period, a glorious foil setting off the alleged failings of her successors; but Stuart texts also represent her as benevolent and majestic absolutist facing down an insubordinate Commons; as master-architect of a via media between prerogative and Parliamentary rule; as female figurehead deferring to the masculine wisdom of her advisors; as Machiavellian despot; as the "embodiment of Whiggery" (109).
His view is consistent with nineteenth century Whiggery that saw man's development in terms of orderly patterns shaped and determined by institutional gradualism.
So it is back to the beginnings of Whiggery and of what became the Whig Party that she goes, to the Exclusion Crisis of 1679-81 and its leading player, the first earl of Shaftesbury, whose grandson, the third earl, some thirty years on would most concisely define the prevailing Whig temper in his Characteristics of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times.
"Lord, deliver us from Whiggery!" was the prayer of one preacher at a Tennessee camp meeting.