Whipple's disease

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Whipple's disease

[′wip·əlz di‚zēz]
(medicine)
A disease characterized by infiltration of the intestinal wall and lymphatics by macrophages filled with glycoprotein. Also known as intestinal lipodystrophy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Primary Whipple disease of the brain: case report with long-term clinical and MRI follow-up.
Hoppe et al., "Rheumatic and musculoskeletal features of Whipple disease: a report of 29 cases," Journal of Rheumatology, vol.
Other hepatic bacterial infections that may cause granulomas include Whipple disease (Tropheryma whippelii), (32) "typhoid nodules" (Salmonella), syphilis, Chlamydia infection, R equi infection, with a granulomatous inflammatory pattern that mimics that of M avium-intracellulare; and melioidosis (Pseudomonas pseudomallei), with either small neutrophilic microabscesses or granulomas.
Godeau, "Whipple disease. Clinical review of 52 cases.
We prescribed treatment for these patients, including 1 who had been taking lifelong prophylactic doxycycline, as reported for a patient with classic Whipple disease (25).
(60,61) Whipple disease, infection by Tropheryma whippelii, almost always involves the small intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes and causes pericarditis in 75%, endocarditis in 50%, myocardial fibrosis in 10%, and myocarditis in 1% of cases.
Thus, a change in genotype in a patient with Whipple disease must be interpreted as an infection with a different strain and cannot be attributed to mutation of the original strain.
Other cases of solitary CNS Whipple disease have also involved the frontoparietal regions, and in one of these, there was associated destruction of the calvarium adjacent to the lesion.
The morphologic differential diagnosis included Mycobacterium species, Whipple disease, and granular cell tumor.
Whipple disease, a rare sporadic disease, was first considered a metabolic disease (1) and later suspected to be an infectious disease caused by a rare bacterium, Tropheryma whipplei (2).
Tropheryma whipplei is a bacterium widely known to be associated with Whipple disease (WD), which is characterized by various clinical signs such as diarrhea, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, and polyarthritis (1).
Tropheryma whipplei is known mainly as the bacterial pathogen responsible for Whipple disease (1).