White Huns

White Huns

or

Hephthalites

(hĕf`thəlīts'), people of obscure origins, possibly of Tibetan or Turkish stock. They were called Ephthalites by the Greeks, and Hunas by the Indians. There is no definite evidence that they are related to the HunsHuns,
nomadic and pastoral people of unknown ethnological affinities who appeared in Europe in the 4th cent. A.D., and built up an empire there. They were organized in a predominantly military manner.
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. The White Huns were an agricultural people with a developed set of laws. They were first mentioned by the Chinese, who described them (A.D. 125) as living in Dzungaria. They displaced the Scythians and conquered Sogdiana and Khorasan before 425. They crossed (425) the Syr Darya (Jaxartes) River and invaded Persia. Held off at first by Bahram Gur, they later (483–85) succeeded in making Persia tributary. After a series of wars (503–13) they were driven out of Persia, permanently lost the offensive, and were finally (557) defeated by Khosru I. The White Huns also invaded India and succeeded in extending their domain to include the Ganges valley. They temporarily overthrew the Gupta empire but were eventually driven out of India in 528 by a Hindu coalition. Although in Persia they had little effect, in India the White Huns influenced society by altering the caste system and disrupting the hierarchy of the ruling families. Some of the White Huns remained in India as a distinct group.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Today, the mother nature is taking its turn at finishing the job and tends to be more thorough than thieves and White Huns at this Buddhist site which is sharply losing its glorious treasure for which these sites are known across the globe,' said Ayaz Kiyani, a scholar while visiting the site with some local and foreign tourists.
The Great Wall of Gorgan and its associated forts provide a unique testimony to the engineering skills and military organization of the Sassanian Empire, which, in its heyday, was involved in a series of wars at its northern frontiers, first against the Hephthalites or White Huns and later against the Turks.
All historic periods witnessed the crossing of different nations: The Acharnians, Greek, Chinese, Aryans, Kushans, Sassnids, Parthian, White Huns and Arabs.
Saleh revealed that from Alchamenian, it onwards came under the sway of many different influences and rulers namely Mauryans, Greeks, Scythians, Kushans, Sasanians, White Huns, Hindu Shahis, Ghaznavids, Slave Dynasty, Ghorids, Suri Afghans, Mughals, Durrani Afghans, Sikhs and the British before creation of Pakistan.
The fragments of paintings collapsed when the White Huns destroyed the sanctuary in the 5th century AD.
Hassan said Buddhism was heavily destroyed in the region after the invasion of White Huns. Following the invasion Buddhists started migrating to Far-East Asia.
Older remnants are from the White Huns, Kushans and Sassanids.
The Shaivite Toramana is said to have destroyed the Ghositarama Buddhist monastery at Kausambi.[Note: Mihirakula, the White Hun, popularly depicted as a Shaivite by many Buddhists like Naresh Kumar, might not have converted to Hinduism.

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