White Pine


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Related to White Pine: western white pine

white pine

A soft, light wood that works easily; does not split when nailed; does not swell or warp appreciably; is widely used in building construction. See also: Masonite

White Pine

 

(Pinus strobus), a tree of the pine family. Its trunk is straight and tall. In its native habitat in North America, it reaches a height of 60 m and a diameter of 150 cm. Young branches are bare, with soft gray-green needles (5-10 cm long) gathered in clumps of five each, which stay on the branches for two or three years. The cones are narrow and cylindrical (8-16 cm long) and are in groups of one to three on long stems. They ripen in the summer of the second year after flowering and open in the fall. The white pine begins to bear fruit after the 25th year, occasionally earlier. It prefers fresh sandy and loamy soils, in which it grows rapidly, outgrowing common pines, firs, and Siberian larch. It grows more poorly than these species in dry and poor soils. White pine is comparatively shade tolerant and wind resistant and is not affected by snow accumulation. It can survive frosts of -30° to -40° C. It is often infested with blebby rust.

White pine has been bred in Europe since the 17th century. It is cultivated as a forest and decorative type in the western and central regions of the European part of the USSR. The tree’s wood is soft and light. It is used in construction for interior parts of buildings; in the furniture, pencil, and match industries; and for plywood and cellulose.

A. P. SHIMANIUK

white pine

A soft, light wood; works easily; does not split when nailed; does not swell or warp appreciably; widely used in building construction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two new White Pine books that will be of particular interest to readers of Latin American literature are Neruda at Isla Negra, a poetry collection by the Nobel Prize-winning Chilean author, and A World of Voices: Celebrating Diversity, a multiethnic poetry anthology edited by Dennis Maloney.
Spearman's rank correlation was used to examine relationships between both [G.sub.i] and mean RHI with total basal area and relative basal area of bigtooth aspen (as a percentage of the total), percentage of white pine advance regeneration and the mean age and age range of advance regeneration for all species on each plot.
White pine was so valuable in the early 18th century that live trees carried the king's mark and received the king's protection.
Joe Manganiello definitely knows how to play the doting boyfriend role very well thanks to his time on "True Blood." Although "Bates Motel" is no supernatural thriller, we're sure Mangiello can handle himself in the dark town of White Pine Bay.
The White Pine Sash site is made up of 43 acres west of Scott Street near Stoddard Street, and it includes 19 vacant acres owned by Scott Street Partners.
A mutant form of white pine blister rust was discovered by Cornell University researcher Kerik Cox in 2011 in Connecticut.
Also known as soft pine, northern pine and Weymouth pine, the white pine is most easily identified by its soft, bluish-green 2-5" long needles, which are set in bundles (called fascicles) of five.
(NYSE: NEE), has announced that one of its subsidiaries has signed a contract to sell its interests in White Pine Hydro Investments LLC.
White Pine owns, via FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC, 351MW of hydro generation related assets in Maine and New Hampshire.
24 December 2012 - The competitive energy unit of US electric and gas utility NextEra Energy Inc (NYSE:NEE) announced it had agreed to sell its interest in hydro generation assets owner White Pine Hydro Investments LLC to Brookfield Renewable Energy Partners LP (TSE:BEP.UN).
In particular, the study investigated and compared the following materials: (1) eastern white pine (Pinus strobus; specific [SP] gravity, 0.35), (2) Choicedek (A.E.R.T.
Questions of Melancholy (White Pine, 1997); and Feast (Harcourt, 2000).