chrysotile

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Related to White asbestos: chrysotile

chrysotile:

see serpentineserpentine
, hydrous silicate of magnesium. It occurs in crystalline form only as a pseudomorph having the form of some other mineral and is generally found in the form of chrysotile (silky fibers) and antigorite and lizardite (which are both tabular).
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chrysotile

[′kris·ō‚tīl]
(mineralogy)
Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 A fibrous form of serpentine that constitutes one type of asbestos.
References in periodicals archive ?
By 1981, the widespread industrial myth of the benign nature of white asbestos was about to break.
The move brought rules on white asbestos into line with a 1991 ban on brown and blue asbestos.
She added: "The HSE was instrumental with this government is bringing about a ban on white asbestos and this year are working to ensure that duty holders are also aware of their responsibility in managing asbestos.
Opponents of white asbestos say that it takes between 15 and 20 years for the symptoms of lung cancer to appear.
PRIME Minister Tony Blair is facing demands to outlaw imports of white asbestos.
DEADLY white asbestos which could kill more than 250,000 Britons in the next 30 years is to be outlawed by the Government.
He notes that there are two types of asbestos - blue and white - and claims that "most experts" believe white asbestos left in place is "virtually harmless:" Again his notes tell another story.
In homes, the most widely used kind is chrysotile, or white asbestos.
Limited Tenders are invited for White Asbestos Dry Rope
He said he was informed there was white asbestos on the roof but it would not pose a problem if it was not broken up.
Brown and white asbestos present in floor and ceiling tiles, wall panels and roof sheets, artex coatings and column casings.
All types of asbestos cause cancer, according to the new International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) report - including white asbestos, sometimes considered less dangerous than brown and blue forms.