Whitecoat

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Whitecoat

 

the newborn pup of several species of seals, including the harp and Caspian seals and Halychoerusgrypus. The whitecoat is covered with long, thick white or yellowish-white fur (hence the name).

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As animal rights organisations celebrated the collapse of Canada's east-coast whitecoat sealing industry, the Inuit in northern Canada - who do not hunt seal pups, only adult harp seals - suffered from the collapse of the market for seal pelts.
Only a few whitecoats roamed the halls of DNAttitudes, Inc., once the sun set.
Pups, known as whitecoats due to fluffy white fur, are approximately 2.8 feet at birth.
Kent also knows that relentless campaigning over the decades has forced Canada to make it illegal to kill baby "whitecoats" for the first 12 days of their lives.
Newborn pups are covered with a long white fur and are called "whitecoats." The pups are nursed for about nine days and then abandoned by their mothers.
Table 4 reports the average prices for whitecoats and adult seals for the period.
Table 4 reveals a reversal in the average price of whitecoats and adult seals.
While larger ships could carry more sealers, an advantage in the harvesting of the resource, the major reason owners invested the additional capital was the larger vessels' ability to gain more reliable access to the whelping patch before the whitecoats had matured into beaters.
When navigation was severely restricted, for example, men often had to range over considerable distances to reach the whitecoats. Sealers usually worked in pairs or larger groups as a safety precaution and to assist one another drag individual tows over hummocky and difficult ice (Jukes 1842, 275).
Readers may not be aware that the cull began at the end of 2005 and media interest is now focusing on the more dramatically brutal killing of the newly-moulted "whitecoats" shown in the photo.
PETA writes: "During Canada's annual seal massacre, hundreds of thousands of baby seals are shot or have their skulls crushed, all for the sake of 'fashion.' Sealers routinely hook seals in the eye, cheek, or mouth to avoid damaging the pelt, then drag the seals across the ice, in many cases without checking to ensure that they are unconscious." PETA doesn't mention that while hunting baby seals is allowed, hunting whitecoat seals - newborn harp seals are white for about 12 days - has been illegal in Canada since 1987.