whole number

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Related to Whole numbers: Rational numbers

whole number

1. an integer
2. a natural number

whole number

[′hōl ¦nəm·bər]
(mathematics)
An integer equal to or greater than zero; one of the numbers 0,1,2,3….
References in periodicals archive ?
From Table 1, we see that the only whole numbers for the areas of Triangle A and Triangle B are 5 [cm.
They can be whole numbers or have decimal places, large or small values, or even data that looks like a number but isn't.
Question 11 required students to locate "2 on two number lines, both starting from zero with whole numbers marked; additionally 11(a) was marked in quarters.
Topics follow the order of whole numbers, fractions, integers, rationals, and reals.
30%) percent of correct response of the CET (Computational Estimation Test) were relatively low when compared with whole numbers (63.
lt;/p><p>Under the right offer, subscription rights will only be exercisable in whole numbers and the company will not issue fractional rights and will round all of the subscription rights down to the nearest whole number.
The Lost Key: A Mystery With Whole Numbers" is the debut title of a new Manga Math Mystery series that uses whole numbers to solve a mystery confronting Kung Fu students Amy, Sam, Adam and Joy.
Whole numbers are in for the February Nielsen Media Research television ratings, showing that Little Rock's four networks are all special in their own way.
one fan marveled, referring to the famous claim by Pierre de Fermat--proved just months earlier--that for any exponent n bigger than 2, there are no nonzero whole numbers a, b, and c for which [a.
For consistency in presentation, I've formatted the columns of data containing dollar values to currency with whole numbers and the columns containing percent values to percentages with two decimal places.
A study of the nation's report card, or National Assessment of Educational Progress, contends that math problems for fourth- and eighth-graders in 2003 were just too easy, in part because they only tested student skills using whole numbers , and not enough fractions and decimals.
The actions of assembling discrete items into equal groups and disassembling them are appropriate experiences both for multiplication and division of whole numbers and for fractions and ratios.