life cycle cost

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Also found in: Financial.

life cycle cost

The cost of a building or equipment (or the like) based not only on the initial expenditure, but also on its maintenance and operating costs over its entire lifetime.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the transition to electric vehicles is managed carefully, fleet operations can be optimised and vehicles used to secure energy market related income to drastically reduce fleet whole-life cost of operations."
It will also reduce the environmental impact, improve the efficiency and reduce whole-life cost of new projects and buildings to help build the houses, schools, hospitals and transport projects we desperately need.
This report primarily compiles data to support whole-life cost estimates for a suite of small-scale distributed green infrastructure technologies with particular emphasis on maintenance costs.
Whole-life cost analysis is an economic evaluation process solely for the purpose of assessing the true cost of constructing and running a building over a period of time, based on the functional requirements of the building.
"To make fuel cells more cost-effective, we need to reduce their whole-life cost and maximise the value of the resources they contain, such as platinum, high-value polymers and carbon fibre.
The model, which made its world premiere at last month's Frankfurt Motor Show, promises major whole-life cost savings for fleet operators and significant financial benefits for company car drivers over rival models.
The model, promises major whole-life cost savings for fleet operators and financial benefits for company car drivers over rival models.
Aligning their objectives right at the start of the project will allow structural, contractual and funding decisions to be aligned to the principles of whole-life cost reduction.
Depreciation is the greatest single whole-life cost of owning a car and it can sometimes be fuelled by massive discounts off the new price.
At the benchmark of 50 million [pounds sterling] per km of TGV-style railway, that's 28 billion [pounds sterling] in capital terms alone, even before the whole-life cost penalties of operating duplicated East Coast and West Coast train fleets are taken into account.
A 2002 government publication on the subject offered the following advice: "Take the long-term view--remember the whole-life cost of the project and specify the outcome you want to achieve."