diffuse sky radiation

(redirected from Why is the sky blue)

diffuse sky radiation

[də¦fyüs ¦skī ‚rād·ē′ā·shən]
(astrophysics)
Solar radiation reaching the earth's surface after having been scattered from the direct solar beam by molecules or suspensoids in the atmosphere. Also known as diffuse skylight; skylight; sky radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Why is the sky blue? Science tells us why the sky looks blue.
WHY is the sky blue? - Jamie Evans, Doncaster LIGHT from the sun is a mixture of all colours of the rainbow but we see it through our atmosphere, which scatters the blue element more effectively because its wavelength is a close match to the size of an oxygen atom.
In a revised translation of the German edition of his book, science writer and editor Hoeppe explores the answer to one of humanity's--at least its younger members'--most recited questions: Why is the sky blue? The deep azure has been pondered throughout the ages by people of all cultures, writes Hoeppe.