diffuse sky radiation

(redirected from Why the sky is blue)

diffuse sky radiation

[də¦fyüs ¦skī ‚rād·ē′ā·shən]
(astrophysics)
Solar radiation reaching the earth's surface after having been scattered from the direct solar beam by molecules or suspensoids in the atmosphere. Also known as diffuse skylight; skylight; sky radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Light is refracted as it passes through our atmosphere, scattering blue light - which is why the sky is blue - but sending reddish light on to the Moon.
WHY THE SKY IS BLUE: DiScovering the Color of Lifo GOTZ HOEPPE
Cardiff Bay's science discovery centre has a special show, Lights in the Sky, in the planetarium - and you can find out why the sky is blue and why comets have spectacular tails, or sit in on a science theatre show that promises to unravel the mysteries of the brain.