Wide-Row Sowing

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Wide-Row Sowing

 

planting the seeds of agricultural crops in rows spaced more than 25 cm apart. Wide spacing, usually measuring 60, 70, or 90 cm, is used for raising such crops as potatoes, sugar beets, corn, sunflower, cotton, feed roots, and many other vegetables. Rows set 25 to 45 cm apart are used for beans, millet, buckwheat, and other crops. Wide-row sowing provides an adequate feeding area, thereby ensuring good shoot development. It also makes possible mechanized row space tilling, enabling timely weeding, soil loosening, and fertilizer application. The sprouts are thinned to achieve correct arrangement of plants in each row.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.