Wiegand effect


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Wiegand effect

[′vē·gänt i‚fekt]
(electricity)
The generation of an electrical pulse in a coil wrapped around or located near a Wiegand wire subjected to a changing magnetic field.
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References in periodicals archive ?
16 with "Achieving Energy Harvesting with the Wiegand Effect," by Christian Fell from FPA.BA B.V, which discusses generating energy from mechanical motion.
The most common card technologies offered are magnetic stripe cards, barium ferrite cards, Wiegand effect cards, and proximity cards (or tags).
The Wiegand effect card technology is a good example.
The Wiegand effect is another energy harvesting technology that generates electrical energy from mechanical motion, in this case, rotations or oscillating motions.
The "Wiegand effect" was first discovered in the 1970s by John Wiegand, a German-American musician and inventor who became interested in the use of magnetic effects in audio equipment.
For more information, see the sidebar, "Inside the Wiegand Effect."
An early commercial application of the Wiegand effect was with access cards for security systems.
Another main application for the Wiegand effect has been to provide power for rotation counters in water and gas meters, and the multi-turn rotary encoders used in industrial motion control applications.