Wilde


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Wilde

Oscar (Fingal O'Flahertie Wills). 1854--1900, Irish writer and wit, famous for such plays as Lady Windermere's Fan (1892) and The Importance of being Earnest (1895). The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891) is a macabre novel about a hedonist and The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898) relates to his experiences in prison while serving a two- year sentence for homosexuality
References in periodicals archive ?
Part IV, "Wilde as Novelist: The Picture of Dorian Gray," begins with Marylu Hill's "Wilde's New Republic: Platonic Questions in Dorian Gray" re-emphasizing Wilde's training "to see the past in active conversation with the present" (231).
Taking inspiration from Wilde's life and work, the event will see a host of local artists creating and exhibiting everything from sculptures to painting -- all of which will be for sale on the spot.
Wilde's own physical appearance was hardly the atrophied Bohemian that his reputation might have suggested.
Although these are distracting at first, the actor inhabits Wilde so fully that the prosthetics are forgotten.
Wilde's notebook warrants the revisionist treatment that the authors compellingly and thoroughly pursue by challenging the dominant scholarly view that it exhibits Wilde's would-be plagiarizing tendencies.
Using Wilde's children's story, The Happy Prince, as an analogy for the author's life allows Everett to create an honourable ode to his hero.
The Happy Prince wades artfully through the despair of Wilde's exile, interspersed with flashbacks.
"The slow motion assassination of Oscar Wilde from the moment he went to prison to the moment he died is a story that possibly goes on in some parts of the world, still," Everett told Reuters TV.
Wilde also spent stints in sales and marketing with Chico's and Columbia Sportswear Co.
His grandson Merlin Holland admitted it is "still very hard to read" some of Wilde's letters written on blue prison paper "where Oscar is on his knees" begging for clemency.
Although this project took the form of a letter to Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde's former lover and the man whose father was responsible for Wilde's imprisonment, we see here that Wilde came to envision this letter as a means by which to form his ideas.
Oscar Wilde's dialogue, "The Critic As Artist," which appeared alongside his other critical essays "Pen, Pencil and Poison," "The Decay of Lying," and "The Truth of Masks" in May 1891 in the collection Intentions, reads the act of criticism as the ultimate human endeavor in which contemplation surpasses action, art outstrips life, and criticism, in turn, consistently bests art as the perfect subjective expression of an intensely individual personality.