Wilfred Laurier

Laurier, Wilfred

 

Born Nov. 20, 1841, in St.-Lin, Quebec; died Feb. 17, 1919, in Ottawa. Canadian statesman and lawyer; leader of the Liberal Party from 1887 to 1919.

Laurier was prime minister from 1896 to 1911. He sought full autonomy for Canada on condition of remaining within the British Empire. In 1897 his government introduced preferential tariffs for British imports and in 1899 sent Canadian troops to the aid of the British in the Boer War of 1899-1902. At the same time, he called for closer economic ties with the USA.

References in periodicals archive ?
Waterloo, ON: Wilfred Laurier University Press, 2018.
HAILEY NAUNTON, WILFRED LAURIER UNIVERSITY Essay title: Transmission and Integration:
The participating universities, from Canada and New Zealand, were University of Waterloo, Thompson Rivers University, University of New Brunswick, Trent University, Vancouver Island University, Wilfred Laurier University, College of New Caledonia, Columbia College, Douglas College, Durham College and Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology.
The participating institutions are College of New Caledonia, Columbia College, Douglas College, Durham College, North Island College, Okanagan College, Golden Hills Schools Division, Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology, Thompson Rivers University, Trent University, University of New Brunswick, University of Waterloo, Vancouver Island University and Wilfred Laurier University.
The partner universities include Ryerson University, located in Toronto, Ontario, Queen's University, located in Kingston, Ontario, and the University of New Brunswick, located in Fredericton and Saint John, New Brunswick and Wilfred Laurier University, located in Waterloo, Ontario, among many others across Canada.
Ontario: Wilfred Laurier University Press, xiii + 287 pp.
Jennifer Gysbers will be studying a double degree in Business and Financial Math at the Wilfred Laurier University.
This book emerged from a conference at Waterloo, sponsored by Waterloo and Wilfred Laurier Universities and organized by Craton, which many of the leading scholars of enslavement attended.
Sunny ways," Trudeau said, quoting former Prime Minister Wilfred Laurier from 100 years ago, saying politics can be a positive force.
He seeks to understand how historical Wyandot saw themselves and their communities as per the goals of Wilfred Laurier's Indigenous Studies Series to recover "Indigenous epistemological frameworks" and "intellectual traditions" (p.