Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe


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Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

(WMAP) NASA probe investigating and mapping the fluctuations in the microwave background radiation that had been discovered by COBE. It was launched June 30 2001 into a halo orbit around the Sun–Earth Lagrangian point L2, about 1.5 million km from the Earth. Originally known as MAP, it was later renamed in memory of the famous cosmologist David Todd Wilkinson, who died in Sept. 2002.
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First year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations: dark energy induced correlation with radio sources.
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team has released its final results from WMAP's epochal 9-year mapping of the microwave background radiation.
NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) space mission, led by Bennett, recently determined that the universe is composed of 4.63 (plus or minus 0.24) percent atoms, 23.3 (plus or minus 2.3) percent dark matter and 72.1 (plus or minus 2.5) percent dark energy.
The analysis is based on the first seven years of data collected by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.
NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), launched in 2001, has been crucial in these precision measurements.
NASA launches the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe to map background radiation.
Using data from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite, researchers from UCL, Imperial College London and the Perimeter Institute have performed the first search for textures on the full sky, finding no evidence for such knots in space.
The world barely noticed, but the team running NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has released results from the satellite's new "seven-year data set," refining the most basic things we know about the cosmos as a whole.
By recording temperature variations more precisely than its predecessor in space, NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe or WMAP, Planck has the chance to measure the composition and shape of the early universe at a resolution 10 times better than any previous mission.
The team ran simulations of what the sky would look like with and without cosmic collisions and developed a ground-breaking algorithm to determine which fit better with the wealth of CMB data from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP).
It's intended to push forward the era of "precision cosmology" that was brought to its present state by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), launched in 2001.
The findings come from an analysis of 5 years of observations of the cosmic microwave background--the radiation left over from the Big Bang--using NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP).