Willem Barents

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Willem Barentsz
BirthplaceTerschelling, Seventeen Provinces
Died
NationalityDutch
Occupation
Navigator
Known for Exploration of the Arctic

Barents, Willem

 

(also W. Barendsz). Born circa 1550 in Amsterdam; died June 20, 1597, near the northern end of Novaia Zemlia. Buried in Novaia Zemlia. Dutch navigator.

Between 1594 and 1597, Barents made three trips around the northern Arctic Ocean with the goal of finding a northeastern passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The expedition of 1596–97 rediscovered Bear and Spitsbergen islands. Impassable ice forced the expedition to winter on the northeastern coast of the island Novaia Zemlia. On the basis of his observations Barents mapped Novaia Zemlia, was the first to make meteorological observations of an annual cycle, and was the first to make soundings along his ship’s course, in the sea which subsequently was given his name. An island of the Spitsbergen archipelago and the settlement and port of Barentsburg, on Vestspitsbergen Island, were also named in honor of Barents.

REFERENCES

Veer. G. de. Plavaniia Barentsa, 1594–1597. Leningrad, 1936.
Pasetskii, V. M. Villem Barents (1550–1597). Moscow, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
| Also in my glass I've sipped a gin named after a Dutch explorer, WILLEM Barentsz. This explorer also has a sea named after him, the Barents Sea, when he was at the forefront of Arctic expeditions in the 16th century.
Willem Barentsz Handcrafted Gin (RRP PS32.95, 31Dover.com, Amazon and masterofmalt.com) is distilled from two grain spirits, winter wheat and golden rye.
| Also in my glass I've sipped gin named after a Dutch explorer, WILLEM Barentsz. This explorer also has a sea named after him, the Barents Sea, when he was at the forefront of Arctic expeditions in the 16th century.
Pumped-up, muscular mountains grow thinner and sharper as we head west, explaining why 16th century Dutch navigator Willem Barentsz named this island Spitsbergen - which translates as "pointed mountains".
Into the Ice Sea is an account, written for a general public, of some Russian-Dutch archaeological expeditions to Novaya Zemlya and Vaygach Island in northern Russia during the 1990s to revisit the site where Willem Barentsz wintered in 1596-97.
His cooperation enabled the group to go by ship, which gave them the opportunity not only to complete the archaeological excavation of the Saved House and look for parts of the ship, but also to search for the grave of Willem Barentsz. For this last part of the project, a pathologist was invited to take part in the expedition to investigate the remains of Willem Barentsz and Claes Andriesz Goutijck should they be found.
The captain decided to sail on northward to Ivanov Bay first, to put ashore the group that would search for the grave of Willem Barentsz, and then return to Ice Harbor to land the excavation group.
Snowmobile guide Marthe Pumped-up, muscular mountains grow thinner and sharper as we head west, explaining why 16th century Dutch navigator Willem Barentsz named this island Spitsbergen - which translates as "pointed mountains".
In search of Het Behouden Huys: A survey of the remains of the house of Willem Barentsz on Novaya Zemlya.