Mengelberg

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Mengelberg

(Josef) Willem . 1871--1951, Dutch orchestral conductor, noted for his performances of the music of Mahler
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Those familiar with Mahler's letters may find that some of the ones to various conductors are absent, such as the one to Willem Mengelberg from August 1906 in which he announced the completion of the Eighth Symphony and described it as setting planets and suns whirling, or the letter to Bruno Walter from summer 1909 in which Mahler announced the completion of his Ninth Symphony.
334 of the Kritischer Bericht), ranging from the earliest 1901 sketches and the 1902/3 autograph score to a plethora of orchestral parts, study scores, and conducting scores dating between 1903 and 1911, which belonged to or were used by not only Mahler, but also Willem Mengelberg, Egon Wellesz, and Bruno Walter, it is extremely difficult to reconstruct and establish the hierarchy among these sources.
Although not played at an excessively slow tempo, Willem Mengelberg's decision to take the repeat in the first movement has made this one of the longest timings of any Eroica.
Likewise, we observed his fallings out with fellow musicians (e.g., Richard Strauss) and the rivalries in which he found himself (vis-a-vis Willem Mengelberg, Wilhelm Furtwangler, and Leopold Stokowski).
Thus the challenge is not so much to produce yet a nother Ninth, this time more in tune with HIP, but rather to appreciate Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Bebung, Clementi's legato, and portamento in Louis Spohr's Fifth, not to mention the tempo rubato of Willem Mengelberg's Mahler.
Drawing on Willem Mengelberg's handwritten annotations to his score of the Fifth, Mitchell thus argues that the Adagietto be seen as a song without words, and he uses aspects of its orchestration to connect it with Mahler's new style; along the way, he disputes the relationship usually seen between the Adagietto and the Ruckert setting "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen." Mitchell also notes the odd chronological paradox that the orchestration of the Fifth Symphony should have caused Mahler such difficulty when he had just created the new and perfect textures of the Ruckert settings.
At that time Alma Mahler presented the conductor Willem Mengelberg, then director of the Concertgebouw Orchestra, with the autograph of the Seventh Symphony that is the subject of this facsimile.
A variety of evidence suggests that Mahler added this famous Adagietto to his overall plan for the Fifth Symphony only when Alma Schindler came into his life in November 1901; the principal witness here is the Dutch conductor and Mahler enthusiast Willem Mengelberg, who wrote in his copy of the movement "N.