William Byrd


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Byrd, William,

1674–1744, American colonial writer, planter, and government official; son of William ByrdByrd, William,
1652–1704, English planter in early Virginia. He came to America as a youth and took up lands he had inherited on both sides of the James River, including the site that would later be Richmond.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (1652–1704). After being educated in England, he became active in the politics of colonial America. He served as member of the House of Burgesses, as receiver-general of Virginia, as Virginia council member, and as colonial agent in England. Byrd inherited a great estate from his father and ultimately owned over 179,000 acres (72,000 hectares). In 1737 he had the city that was to be RichmondRichmond.
1 City (1990 pop. 87,425), Contra Costa co., W Calif., on San Pablo Bay, an inlet of San Francisco Bay; inc. 1905. It is a deepwater commercial port and an industrial center with oil refineries and railroad repair shops.
..... Click the link for more information.
 laid out on one of his estates. His service in 1728 as one of the commissioners to survey the North Carolina–Virginia boundary and his many trips into the backwoods provided the material for much of his writings; A History of the Dividing Line, A Journey to the Land of Eden, and A Progress to the Mines were all based on his diaries. Byrd's polished style and crisp wit, in addition to his valuable record of Southern life, have won him a reputation as one of the foremost colonial authors. At his death he left a library of some 4,000 volumes at his Westover estate.

Bibliography

See his diaries and other writings (1941, 1942, 1970); biography by P. Marambaud (1971).


Byrd, William,

1543–1623, English composer, organist at Lincoln Cathedral and, jointly with Tallis, at the Chapel Royal. Although Roman Catholic, he composed anthems and services for the English Church in addition to his great Roman masses and Latin motets. He was esteemed by his contemporaries and was favored by Queen Elizabeth I, who, in 1575, granted to Byrd and Tallis a patent for the exclusive printing and selling of music. Byrd also composed instrumental music.

Bibliography

See biography by K. McCarthy (2013); studies by E. H. Fellowes (2d ed. 1948), O. W. Neighbor (1978), and J. Kerman (1981).


Byrd, William,

1652–1704, English planter in early Virginia. He came to America as a youth and took up lands he had inherited on both sides of the James River, including the site that would later be Richmond. In 1691 he moved to "Westover," long famous as the Byrd family home. His landed fortune was increased by his interest in trade, and he served (1703) as president of the Virginia council. Byrd's wealth, culture, and character made him the ideal tidewater aristocrat. He was the father of William ByrdByrd, William,
1674–1744, American colonial writer, planter, and government official; son of William Byrd (1652–1704). After being educated in England, he became active in the politics of colonial America.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (1674–1744).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Byrd, William

 

Born circa 1543, possibly in Lincolnshire; died July 4, 1623, in Stondon-Massey, Essex. English composer, founder of the national madrigal school and representative of the virginalist school of musicians; organist and music publisher.

Byrd was a master of Catholic and Anglican choral music, including psalms and graduals, and of secular music—madrigals, motets, fantasies, variations for the virginal, chamber music for strings, and songs—in which he made extensive use of popular melodies. Features typical of Renaissance music—the cult of beauty and pleasure and the rejection of medieval asceticism—appeared in secular music, where they were artistically embodied in a wealth of melody and harmony, in rhythmic variety, and in polyphonic richness. Byrd formulated his aesthetic principles in the foreword to his Psalms, Sonnets and Songs of Sadness and Piety (1588). He was noted for his prodigious output. About 140 compositions were published in 20 volumes in London between 1937 and 1950.

REFERENCE

Fellowes, E. H. William Byrd, 2nd ed., London, 1948.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Byrd, William

(1674–1744) statesman, author; born in Westover, Va. After being educated in England (1684–92), he became a member of the House of Burgesses and then the Council of State in 1709. He resisted Governor Alexander Spotswood's effort to take away the Council's position as the supreme court in Virginia. From 1704 on, he managed the vast properties and immense fortune inherited from his father. His manuscripts, letters, and diaries provide an intimate look at the life of the gentry in 18th-century Virginia.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
and ethnohistory" (as the publishers anticipated), but serious scholarship about Beverley's place in early American literature will demand textual detective work on a par with Kevin Berland's edition of The Dividing Line Histories of William Byrd II.
The first, "Turning a New Leaf: William Byrd, the East Music-Publishing Firm and the Jacobean Succession" by Jeremy Smith, discusses the relationship between William Byrd, who was a Roman Catholic composer and royal patentee well known and respected in court circles, and the stationer and music publisher Thomas East.
(18) Describing church attendance patterns in his late 1740s diary, perambulating minister Robert Rose repeatedly noted that he preached "to a great Number of people," "to a numerous congregation," and "to a great many people." (19) Similarly, parishioner William Byrd II noted "a very great congregation" on February 20, 1709, "the biggest congregation I ever saw in the country" on November 13, 1709, and "an abundance of people" on January 11, 1710.
He tells the story of Thomas Tallis and William Byrd, two Catholic composers writing for a Protestant queen, who were at the centre of England's own musical Renaissance.
William Byrd and His Contemporaries: Essays and a Monograph.
My Ladye Nevells Booke contains 42 works by William Byrd, the greatest English composer of the Elizabethan age, including the pieces, Carman's Whistle and Sellinger's Round.
An eighteenth-century text written by William Byrd II, a wealthy planter and government official in Virginia, this book (together with its companion, The History of the Dividing Line) is an account of the author's journeys mapping the border between Virginia, the first English colony in North America, and the newer colony of North Carolina.
On any given Sunday in Canada, she said, one can listen in an Anglican church to "music the way it was supposed to be played," she said, naming Mass by William Byrd, motets by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina and Thomas Tallis.
According to William Byrd, a detective with the Atlanta Police Department's Fraud Unit, it is best for innocent individuals to remain calm should they find themselves investigated for counterfeit money fraud.