William Cecil


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Cecil, William:

see Burghley, William Cecil, 1st BaronBurghley or Burleigh, William Cecil, 1st Baron
, 1520–98, English statesman.
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References in classic literature ?
It was not for William Cecil Clayton, Lord Greystoke, that he had denied his birth.
* Burghley: William Cecil at the Court of Elizabeth I
"That was the ultimate fake news, where William Cecil took letters that she had written to different confidants and basically re-edited them to look like she was plotting to kill Elizabeth." ?Mary Queen of Scots is available now digitally and on DVD and Blu-Ray.
Elizabeth's adviser William Cecil (Guy Pearce) suggests controlling Mary through a marriage, but Mary chooses her first cousin, Lord Darnley (Jack Lowden), and they produce a son and heir, James.
Elizabeth's advisor William Cecil (Guy Pearce) suggests controlling Mary through a marriage, but Mary chooses her first cousin, Lord Darnley (Jack Lowden), and they produce a son and heir, James.
Elizabeth's trusted adviser William Cecil (Guy Pearce) suggests the simplest way to control Mary would be through a marriage to the queen's "special friend" Robert Dudley (Joe Alwyn).
David Tennant is a fiery John Knox and Guy Pierce as Elizabeth's trusted but devious advisor William Cecil.
The Australian star portrays Elizabeth's highest-ranking close advisor and Protestant advocate Sir William Cecil.
The other characters in this political drama, circa 16th century, include the Earl of Moray (James McArdle), John Knox (David Tennant), Sir William Cecil (Guy Pearce), Robert Dudley (Joe Alwyn), Lord Alwyn (Jack Lowden), Bess of Hardwick (Gemma Chan), Rizzio (Ismael Cruz Cordova) and English Nobleman (Philip Gascoyne).
He was born to William Cecil and Marjorie Helen (nee Jamieson) King on Dec.
He explains that Medley's "Brief discourse of Rhetorike" survives in a single manuscript dated 1575 among the papers of William Cecil, to whom it is dedicated.
Among the papers of William Cecil, the great Elizabethan statesman, resides a set of treatises on Irish affairs--known as the "Hatfield Compendium"--that reveal what the early Tudor court knew of Irish politics, geography, revenue, economy, social practices, and the state of the Reformation in Ireland.