William Herschel Telescope


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William Herschel Telescope

(her -shĕl) A 4.2-meter reflecting telescope with an altazimuth mounting sited at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in the Canaries and forming part of the Isaac Newton Group. It is largely a UK telescope with the Dutch and Spanish sharing observing time. It began regular operations in 1987. It has a glass-ceramic (Cer-Vit) primary mirror of great thermal stability and a focal ratio of f/2.4. The telescope can be used in a Cassegrain configuration (there is also an off-axis ‘broken Cassegrain’ focus). In addition, light from the secondary mirror can be diverted through the altitude bearings of the Y-shaped fork mounting to two Nasmyth foci, where heavy instruments can be mounted. Sophisticated electronic equipment detects and analyzes the light. In 2000, the William Herschel Infrared Camera (WHIRCAM) was replaced by the Isaac Newton Group Red Imaging Device (INGRID), a near-infrared camera for use mainly at the telescope's Cassegrain focus. INGRID is optimized for a wide field of view at relatively short wavelengths (0.8–2.5 μm). Its 1024 × 1024 near-infrared detector array provides imaging at a resolution of 0.25 arcseconds per pixel.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
This dwarf star was selected from SDSS/BOSS as a metal-poor candidate and follow-up spectroscopic observations at medium-resolution were obtained with ISIS at William Herschel Telescope and OSIRIS at Gran Telescopio de Canarias," the researchers wrote in the paper.
The X-ray emission, representing the accretion disc 'feeding' the jet at its base, was captured from Earth orbit by NASA's NuSTAR telescope, while the moment the jet became visible as optical light was caught by the ULTRACAM high-speed camera, mounted on the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma, in the Canary Islands.
With the VLT spectrum in hand, as well as a run of high-speed photometry from the William Herschel Telescope, the ball started rolling.
As the Earth turns on its axis and the sun rises on Hawaii, the webcast moves around the world, visiting the Anglo-Australian Telescope at 1pm BST, Jodrell Bank Observatory near Manchester at 6pm BST, the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands at 12.10am BST (Saturday morning), finishing up at the Palomar Observatory in California at 09.40am BST, along with dozens of other observatories in between.
Andrews in Scotland and his colleagues used the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands.
They used William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands to observe the Crab Nebula, located 6,500 light years away in constellation Taurus and compared that data with the observation of Cassiopeia A (Cas A) taken some five years ago.
The first MOAO-enabled image was obtained in 2010 on the 4.2-meter William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands.
The observation was made by UK astronomers, using the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC) William Herschel Telescope on La Palma.
Armed with these images, as well a smaller set his team took with the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Spain, and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea, Shanks' team found that the number of galaxies increases sharply as their brightness decreases.
Using spectroscopy from the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Campbell and her colleagues found that Gaia14aae contains large amounts of helium, but no hydrogen, which is highly unusual as hydrogen is the most common element in the Universe.