William

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Related to William Rufus: Henry I, William the Conqueror

William

, crown prince of Germany
William or Frederick William, 1882–1951, crown prince of Germany, son of William II. In World War I he commanded (1914) an army on the Western Front and was nominal commander in the German attack (1916) on Verdun. He fled to Holland in Nov., 1918, and renounced his rights to the throne, but he returned (1923) to Germany with the permission of the Weimar government. He was a supporter of Adolf Hitler for a time.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

William

 

(Wilhelm). In Germany:

William I (Hohenzollern). Born Mar. 22, 1797, in Berlin; died there Mar. 9, 1888. King of Prussia from 1861 and German emperor from 1871. From 1858 to 1861, William was regent when King Frederick William IV became feeble-minded. In German nationalistic literature there were efforts to give William I the credit for forming a unified German monarchical state and to create the legend of “William the Great.” In fact, however, during William I’s reign Prussia and later the German Empire were ruled by Bismarck.

REFERENCES

Narochnitskaia, L. I. Rossiia i voiny Prussii v 60-kh gg. XIX v. za ob”edinenie Germanii “sverkhu.” Moscow, 1960.
Sybel, H. Die Begrundung des Deutschen Reiches durch Wilhelm I, 3rd. ed., vols. 1–7. Munich-Berlin, 1913.
William II. Born Jan. 27, 1859, in Potsdam; died June 4, 1941, Utrecht Province, the Netherlands. German emperor and Prussian king from 1888 to 1918, grandson of William I. A representative of aggressive German Junker-bourgeois imperialism, William II actively contributed to the unleashing of World War I. He was overthrown by revolution on Nov. 9, 1918, and fled to the Netherlands. On Nov. 28, 1918, William II abdicated.

WORKS

In Russian translation:
Perepiska Vil’gel’ma II s Nikolaem II , 1394-1914. Moscow-Petrograd [1923].
Memuary: Sobytiia i liudi. Moscow-Petrograd, 1923.

REFERENCES

Erusalimskii, A. S. Vneshniaia politika i diplomatiia germanskogo imperializma v kontse XIX v., 2nd ed. Moscow, 1951.
Schreiner, A. Zur Geschichte der deutschen Aussenpolitik 1871-1945 [2nd ed.], vol. 1. Berlin, 1955.

William

 

(Willem). In the Netherlands:

William I (Frederick). Born Aug. 24, 1772, at The Hague; died Dec. 12, 1843, in Berlin. Prince of Orange, count of Nassau, and king of the Netherlands from 1815 to 1840.

By the decision of the Congress of Vienna of 1814-15, William I was proclaimed king of the united Dutch and Belgian Kingdom of the Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg. He tried to suppress the Belgian Revolution of 1830, and until 1839 he refused to recognize the independence of Belgium. Popular discontent with his policies compelled him to abdicate in 1840 in favor of his son William.

William II (Frederick Georg Lodewijk). Born Dec. 12, 1792, at The Hague; died Mar. 17, 1849, in Tilburg. King from 1840 to 1849, grand duke of Luxembourg; son of William I.

In 1815, William II commanded the troops of the Nether-lands at the Battle of Waterloo. Under the pressure of the national liberation movement of the Belgian people he recognized Belgium’s independence in October 1830, which caused his father to remove him from his post as commander of the Netherlands armed forces. He was married to Anna Pavlovna, sister of the Russian emperor Alexander I. Under the influence of revolutionary events in a number of European countries in 1848, he introduced liberal reforms in the constitution, finances, and taxation.

William III (Alexander Paul Frederick Lodewijk). Born Feb. 19, 1817, in Brussels; died Nov. 23, 1890, at the Loo. King from 1849 to 1890, grand duke of Luxembourg; son of William II.

Alarmed by the European revolutions of 1848-49, William III was obliged to abide by the constitution and to leave the solution of a number of problems confronting the state to the parliament. Maneuvering between the conservatives and the liberals, he struggled against the latter and twice (1866 and 1867) prorogued the lower house.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

William

the Conqueror (1027–1087) commanded Normans in conquest of Britain; victor at Hastings (1066). [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 42–46]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

William

1. known as William the Lion. ?1143--1214, king of Scotland (1165-- 1214)
2. Prince. born 1982, first son of Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
the Michael Field dramas, William Rufus and Brutus Ultor, and the
It was written, for instance, in a charter of Lewes Monastery that William the Conqueror, not William Rufus, created William de Warren first earl of Surrey; Thomas Walsingham wrote that Henry de Lacy was earl of Salisbury as well as Lincoln; records in Walden Monastery indicate Geoffrey de Mandeville was lord of the honor of Walden.
Robert Grierson, William Rufus Foote and Duncan McRae were appointed.
The exclusionary rule was an early 20th century invention, and its author, Supreme Court Justice William Rufus Day, was a political and diplomatic strategist who acted with exceptional courage to create the rule--one that differed greatly from that which is vilified today.
Sources: Freeman, Edward A., The Reign of William Rufus and the Accession of Henry I.
William Rufus King and <IR> NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE </IR> both wrote campaign biographies of Pierce in 1852.
The current landmark dates back to 1097 when William Rufus laid the foundation stone for Westminster Hall.
The coffin long thought to contain William Rufus, a hated king who was killed by an arrow through the chest, might actually hold someone else.
It embroiled him in years of dispute with two successive English kings, William Rufus and Henry I, largely over the question of how far he and other prelates and abbots owed obedience to the king rather than to the pope.
Exploring other personal networks of influence and learning, Rega Wood challenges recent scholarship suggesting that William Rufus in the thirteenth century rejected the argument in Anselm's Proslogion for the existence of God and the neoplatonic tradition.
King County in Washington realigned itself in 1986, tossing out its early namesake, slaveholder William Rufus DeVane King in favor of the Rev.
The house is said to have been named for the adjoining ruins of Lyonshall Castle, which was built by William Rufus and demolished in 1307 during the reign of Edward II when the town of Lyonshall itself was destroyed by fire.