Shawn, William

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Shawn, William

(1907–92) editor; born in Chicago. As the New Yorker 's managing editor (1939–52), and as its skilled if autocratic editor in chief (1952–87), he exercised a strong influence on the magazine's development.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet my hunch is that his understanding of the possibilities inherent in certain kinds of reportage did not originate with him or with his peers, but was precipitated by William Shawn, the magazine's editor, whom J.D.
She passed it along to the magazine's editor (and her lover), William Shawn, who published a long excerpt in September 1970.
In conjunction, William Shawn Clark, the president of Viabuilt, is also the President and sole shareholder of Firetainment Inc.
Groomed to succeed legendary New Yorker Editor William Shawn, Whitworth instead hired on as editor-in-chief at the Atlantic after real estate mogul Mortimer Zuckerman bought the magazine in 1980, according to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture.
In the chapter entitled "Fighting over Words," for example, he discusses his interaction with Robert Gottlieb, the person who replaced William Shawn as the editor of "The New Yorker." He summarized his new editor at the time in a cutting way: "If eccentricity was a criterion for the job, Bob was qualified."
"Oh, no, not for us," the editor William Shawn used to admonish writers who championed a profane quote or racy pun.
Buckley Jr., a favorite of the legendary editor, William Shawn; "Wayward Press" features by A.J.
Groomsmen were Bradley Allen Futch of Midland, Texas; John Phillip Garrett, William Scott Gibson, Christopher James Moffett, William Shawn Stewart, Daniel Bailey Whitehead, and Walter Gavin Whitehead all of Meridian; Charles Alexander Hensleigh of Alexander City, Alabama; and William Charles Ledbetter of Birmingham, Alabama.
(Nicholas Woodeson's William Shawn, editor of The New Yorker, may regret the discomfort the decision brought but shows quiet courage.)
The film focuses on the 1961 trial of a former Nazi, Adolf Eichmann, which Arendt covered for the distinguished magazine The New Yorker under the aegis of editor William Shawn (Nicholas Woodeson).
The pieces are loosely organized to highlight connections, with a piece on a memoir by Allen Shawn coming before a short tribute to his father, William Shawn, the vaunted editor of the New Yorker, for example.