William of Malmesbury


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William of Malmesbury

(mämz`bərē), c.1096–1143, English writer, monk of Malmesbury. His most important work is the Gesta regum Anglorum, a history of the kings of England from 449 to 1127, with its continuation, Historia novella (ed. by William Stubbs, 1887–89). Book V is contemporary history, especially valuable for the reigns of Henry I and Stephen. The work appeared in English as The Chronicle of the Kings of England (see ed. by J. A. Giles, 1847, repr. 1968). He also wrote Gesta pontificum Anglorum, a source for early ecclesiastical history and for several saints' lives.
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Over the past forty years, Rodney Thomson has established himself as the authority on the life and works of William of Malmesbury. It is reassuring then for scholars of England's foremost twelfth-century historian to find Thomson's name attached to a project such as Discovering William of Malmesbury.
(13) William of Malmesbury, Vita Dunstani, William of Malmesbury: Saints' Lives, ed.
By contrast, the opening capital of William of Malmesbury's Gesta is only three lines in height, and does not look any different from the second order uncial capitals that mark the beginnings of smaller textual divisions, generally alternating red and blue with contrasting filigree.
In fact, Foot describes in her appendix how William of Malmesbury may have done just that.
Chapter 3 deals with the age of William of Malmesbury, Geoffrey of Monmouth, and Gerald of Wales.
Such depictions stem more from the ideological axes that post-Conquest authors like William of Malmesbury, Orderic Vitalis, and Henry of Huntingdon had to grind than from any fair-minded attempt to understand the Anglo-Saxon episcopacy in context (ch.
Under most headings, the expected texts are discussed, for example, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under chronicle, but also one finds William of Malmesbury and Henry of Hutingdon.
Thomson, "Satire, Irony, and Humour in William of Malmesbury"; Michael Winterbottom, "The Language of William of Malmesbury"; Cary J.
These legal texts chart her personal involvement as a ruler with the affairs of the kingdom.(2) The chronicles of William of Malmesbury,(3) and the anonymous Gesta Stephani Regis,(4) reveal anxiety over the prospect of Matilda as a powerful queen by elaborating and maximizing the roles of male relations and rivals, thus reducing the representation of Matilda as a powerful figure.
Indeed, mediaeval chronicler William of Malmesbury reckoned that Harold lost the Battle of Hastings in 1066 because his men were too drunk to fight properly.
'at Bruna's geweorc ('fortification')') in Simeon, Brunandune in AEthelweard's chronicle, Brunefort (probably ford) in the Liber de Hyda, and Brunefeld in William of Malmesbury, at least some of which are presumably expressions, or even names, denoting actual localities (a farm, a down, a ford, etc.) in the neighbourhood.
At his court, wrote William of Malmesbury, "the model for young men was to rival women in delicacy of person, to mince their gait, to walk with loose gesture and half naked."