William

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Related to William the Conqueror: Richard the Lionheart, Magna Carta

William

, crown prince of Germany
William or Frederick William, 1882–1951, crown prince of Germany, son of William II. In World War I he commanded (1914) an army on the Western Front and was nominal commander in the German attack (1916) on Verdun. He fled to Holland in Nov., 1918, and renounced his rights to the throne, but he returned (1923) to Germany with the permission of the Weimar government. He was a supporter of Adolf Hitler for a time.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

William

 

(Wilhelm). In Germany:

William I (Hohenzollern). Born Mar. 22, 1797, in Berlin; died there Mar. 9, 1888. King of Prussia from 1861 and German emperor from 1871. From 1858 to 1861, William was regent when King Frederick William IV became feeble-minded. In German nationalistic literature there were efforts to give William I the credit for forming a unified German monarchical state and to create the legend of “William the Great.” In fact, however, during William I’s reign Prussia and later the German Empire were ruled by Bismarck.

REFERENCES

Narochnitskaia, L. I. Rossiia i voiny Prussii v 60-kh gg. XIX v. za ob”edinenie Germanii “sverkhu.” Moscow, 1960.
Sybel, H. Die Begrundung des Deutschen Reiches durch Wilhelm I, 3rd. ed., vols. 1–7. Munich-Berlin, 1913.
William II. Born Jan. 27, 1859, in Potsdam; died June 4, 1941, Utrecht Province, the Netherlands. German emperor and Prussian king from 1888 to 1918, grandson of William I. A representative of aggressive German Junker-bourgeois imperialism, William II actively contributed to the unleashing of World War I. He was overthrown by revolution on Nov. 9, 1918, and fled to the Netherlands. On Nov. 28, 1918, William II abdicated.

WORKS

In Russian translation:
Perepiska Vil’gel’ma II s Nikolaem II , 1394-1914. Moscow-Petrograd [1923].
Memuary: Sobytiia i liudi. Moscow-Petrograd, 1923.

REFERENCES

Erusalimskii, A. S. Vneshniaia politika i diplomatiia germanskogo imperializma v kontse XIX v., 2nd ed. Moscow, 1951.
Schreiner, A. Zur Geschichte der deutschen Aussenpolitik 1871-1945 [2nd ed.], vol. 1. Berlin, 1955.

William

 

(Willem). In the Netherlands:

William I (Frederick). Born Aug. 24, 1772, at The Hague; died Dec. 12, 1843, in Berlin. Prince of Orange, count of Nassau, and king of the Netherlands from 1815 to 1840.

By the decision of the Congress of Vienna of 1814-15, William I was proclaimed king of the united Dutch and Belgian Kingdom of the Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg. He tried to suppress the Belgian Revolution of 1830, and until 1839 he refused to recognize the independence of Belgium. Popular discontent with his policies compelled him to abdicate in 1840 in favor of his son William.

William II (Frederick Georg Lodewijk). Born Dec. 12, 1792, at The Hague; died Mar. 17, 1849, in Tilburg. King from 1840 to 1849, grand duke of Luxembourg; son of William I.

In 1815, William II commanded the troops of the Nether-lands at the Battle of Waterloo. Under the pressure of the national liberation movement of the Belgian people he recognized Belgium’s independence in October 1830, which caused his father to remove him from his post as commander of the Netherlands armed forces. He was married to Anna Pavlovna, sister of the Russian emperor Alexander I. Under the influence of revolutionary events in a number of European countries in 1848, he introduced liberal reforms in the constitution, finances, and taxation.

William III (Alexander Paul Frederick Lodewijk). Born Feb. 19, 1817, in Brussels; died Nov. 23, 1890, at the Loo. King from 1849 to 1890, grand duke of Luxembourg; son of William II.

Alarmed by the European revolutions of 1848-49, William III was obliged to abide by the constitution and to leave the solution of a number of problems confronting the state to the parliament. Maneuvering between the conservatives and the liberals, he struggled against the latter and twice (1866 and 1867) prorogued the lower house.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

William

the Conqueror (1027–1087) commanded Normans in conquest of Britain; victor at Hastings (1066). [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 42–46]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

William

1. known as William the Lion. ?1143--1214, king of Scotland (1165-- 1214)
2. Prince. born 1982, first son of Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This Easter, Warwick Castle will also be hosting expert-led tours and a new Conqueror's Fortress exhibition, showcasing the influence William the Conqueror and the Normans had on today's site.
The invasion of England by Duke William of Normandy, better known as William the Conqueror, and his victory over the Anglo-Saxon King Harold at the Battle of Hastings, changed the course of English history.
The McCauslands were originally seated in Drenagh, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, and trace their ancestry through the Rouse-Boughton family, to Edward Somerset, 2nd Marquess of Worcester, a descendant of William the Conqueror via Edward III and the Beauforts, Dukes of Somerset.
The author describes William the Conqueror's duchess (and then queen) as "diminutive yet formidable' who went on to 'break the mould of female consorts' through the establishment of an 'active queenship'.
Aird (medieval history, Cardiff U.) presents a biography of the eldest son of William the Conqueror. His heroic activities during 1099 in the First Crusade made him one of the most famous men in northwestern Europe, overshadowing even his father's victory in 1066 at Hastings, but he was defeated in battle by his younger brother, then King Henry I of England, and spent the rest of his long life in prison in Cardiff.
STATEHOOD DAY (CALIFORNIA) 1087: William the Conqueror died in Rouen, France, from injuries received when his horse stumbled while he was fighting the King of France.
But she has to go back 1,000 years to the very beginning of the royals - William The Conqueror - to find a link.
William the Conqueror brought apple pie to England from France in 1066.
According to reports, filmmakers are planning to give a cinema treatment to the clash between King Harold and William the Conqueror as the falling out of two comrades.
back to William the Conqueror as you look down on the lower classes.
I remember reading somewhere that William the Conqueror sent troops up north to reap a terrible toll on Warrenby for non-payment of taxes.
Princes of Wales, heirs to the throne from William the Conqueror onwards, have had a chequered history in not making the throne.