Willis Van Devanter


Also found in: Legal, Wikipedia.

Van Devanter, Willis

(văn dēvăn`tər), 1859–1941, American jurist, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1910–37), b. Marion, Ind. He practiced law (1881–84) in Indiana and, after he removed to Wyoming, became (1889) chief justice of the Wyoming supreme court. He had a prominent role in Republican party politics and served as Assistant U.S. Attorney General (1897–1903) and U.S. circuit court judge (1905–10). Appointed to the Supreme Court by President Taft, Van Devanter was one of the quartet of conservative justices who opposed most of the New Deal legislation.

Van Devanter, Willis

(1859–1941) Supreme Court justice; born in Marion, Ind. His involvement in frontier politics led to his appointment as assistant U.S. attorney general (1897–1903) and as a federal judge (1903–10). President Taft named him to the U.S. Supreme Court (1911–37). As a conservative, he often opposed President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal measures.
References in periodicals archive ?
(22) Just days later, Senator Burton Wheeler informed the White House that Justice Willis Van Devanter would announce his retirement from the Court on May 18, and hinted that Justice George Sutherland also planned to retire soon.
THE COURT'S FOUR CONSERVATIVE JUSTICES--James Clark McReynolds, Willis Van Devanter, Pierce Butler, and George Sutherland--joined initially by Owen Roberts and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, were convinced that these doctrines concerning the separation of powers, federalism, and fundamental rights were indispensible foundations of the nation's constitutional order.
White Chief justice 1910-1921 Willis Van Devanter Associate justice 1911-1937 Joseph R.
This was thereafter known as "the switch in time that saved nine." Next, one of the oldest and most conservative members of the Court, Willis Van Devanter, retired, giving the President the opportunity to appoint a new member of the Court without the need for the Court-packing plan.