Winckelmann


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Winckelmann

Johann Joachim . 1717--68, German archaeologist and art historian; one of the founders of neoclassicism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosenthal examines Kauffman's conceptions of gender in her portraits of male sitters such as Winckelmann, Johann Gottfried Herder (1791), and Antonio Canova (1795-96) in Chapter 6, "Civilizing Femininity." Although they are often described as androgynous, Rosenthal argues that these portraits "allowed the represented men to obtain an ideal image of themselves as virtuously cultivated" and thus, participants in the age of sensibility (221).
Greek art in contrast, particularly sculpture (Bowie 1990, 106), which retained the special status given it by Winckelmann, possessed such unity.
A similar process of knowledgeable interpretation is available to readers of Wilde's poem 'Charmides' (1881), which Ellmann suggests was inspired by Pater's essay on Winckelmann and by a story from Lucian in which a young man fondles a statue of Aphrodite.
"The calmer the state of a body," Winckelmann had argued, "the fitter it is to express the true character of the soul" (43).
A sampling of chapter topics includes historicism; nihilism; the legacy of hellenic harmony in the works of Goethe, Winckelmann, Herder, Kant, and Schiller; aesthetics in philosophy in the works of Kant, Adorno, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty; and the theme of overcoming epistemology, with attention to the work of Descartes, Kant, Heidegger, and Husserl.
In contrast to this, he possessed seven different works by Winckelmann, probably retained from his own original library, plus a volume of Winckelmann's letters borrowed from the ducal library; his declared intention, in 1776, to produce a complete edition of Winckelmann's works appears to have been a serious one.
Chronologically, the Neo-Classical values of the post-revolutionary period, coupled with the writings of Winckelmann on eighteenth-century archaeological finds, meant that, as pointed out by Isabelle Leroy-Jay Lemaistre, marble reigned supreme in the world of the Empire and the First Restoration, notwithstanding Andre Chenier's nostalgia for the energy, rather than the forms of sculptural transformation, as outlined in a fine essay by Jean Starobinski.
We do not have to return to Winckelmann in order to recognize such rather obvious facts.