Windows 3.1


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Windows 3.1

(operating system)
A version of Microsoft Windows with many improvements over Windows 3.0, including True Type Fonts, Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) and Mouse Trails for use with LCD Devices. It also saw the loss of Real Mode, which meant it would no longer run on Intel 8086 processors (did anyone ever do this anyway?).

Sometimes described as "stand-alone Windows", in contrast to Windows for Workgroups 3.1. Windows 3.11 is a free bug-fix update. 3.1's successors are Windows 95 and Windows NT.

Windows 3.1

A major upgrade to Windows 3.0, introduced in 1992. It added more stability and support for multimedia, TrueType fonts, compound documents (OLE) and drag & drop. Windows 3.1 ran 16-bit Windows and DOS applications but was unable to run subsequent 32-bit Windows programs written for Windows 95 and beyond. Windows 3.11 added peer-to-peer networking and was the last 16-bit 3.x version of Windows.

After 32-bit Windows 95 was released, many 16-bit Windows 3.1 applications ran smoothly under Windows 95 and subsequent versions. However, the newer 32-bit versions of Windows supported long file names, and Windows 3.1 applications could not resolve them (see Win Short file names). See Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.x modes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Target System (for installing package): Windows 3.1, 95, 95b, NT 3.51, NT (SP1-SP6), 98, ME, 2000, and XP (RC)
Multimedia PC, Windows 3.1 or higher, Pentium or higher, 12MB RAM, double speed CD-ROM drive, SVGA display.
Windows: 486DX2/66MHz or higher, minimum of 12 MB (16 MB recommended for Windows 98), 256 color, 640 X 480 display, 16-bit sound card, quad-speed CD-ROM drive, Windows 3.1, 95, 98.
While it runs in a DOS window under Windows 3.1, 95, 98 or NT, it is ideal for users of older PC equipment who have had trouble with applications designed for high-end PC's.
The CD-ROM is compatible with the Macintosh and with Windows 3.1 and higher.
RoboHELP Office 6.0 supports the creation of WinHelp systems for Windows 95, Windows NT 3.51/4.0, and Windows 3.1.
Of those users employing PC-based LIMS, over 35% are using Windows NT for the server operating system and approximately three-fourths are using either Windows NT, Windows 95, or Windows 3.1 (see graph at above right).
It's selling well, but it's not the big move that the change from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 was," she said.
The class limit is 25 students for each course, and students, most of whom take two courses at once, need to have at least a 486 multimedia computer with Windows 3.1 (or a comparable Macintosh).
If you have Windows 3.1 or 3.11 double-check the installation instructions.
The software is available for Windows 3.1 and up or Windows '95.
$129-$249 (January 1992, April 1997).* Windows 3.1 and 95 (forthcoming MacOS version).