Wire Glass


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wire glass

[′wīr ‚glas]
(materials)
Sheet glass with woven wire mesh embedded in the center of the sheet; used in building construction for windows, doors, floors, and skylights.

wire glass

Flat or patterned glass having a square or a diamond wire mesh embedded within the two faces to prevent shattering in the event of breakage or excessive heat. Wire glass is considered a safety glazing material. See also: Glass

Wire Glass

 

(safety glass), silicate sheet glass into which a metallic net has been pressed during formation. Wire glass is used for glass enclosures of the apertures and roofs of buildings and structures and for see-through walls, barriers, stairwell enclosures, elevator shafts, and other applications. It is produced by continuous rolling. When subject to a blow or to the action of high temperatures, wire glass does not shatter. It can be cut and broken without shattering. The metallic net is made of wire .35-.45 mm in diameter. The dimensions of wire glass produced in the USSR are length, 1,200–2,000 mm; width, 400–1,500 mm; and thickness, 0.7–5.5 mm. Wire glass allows the passage of not less than 65 percent of light striking it.

wire glass, wired glass, safety glass

Sheet glass containing wire mesh embedded between the two faces to prevent shattering in the event of breakage.
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