wire recording

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wire recording

[′wīr ri‚kȯrd·iŋ]
(engineering acoustics)
Magnetic recording by use of a magnetized wire.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wire recording

An audio recording system that magnetized an ultra-thin wire as the medium. First invented in 1898, several wire recorders were developed over the years but were never very popular. In the 1920s and 1930s, Edison's wax cylinders were more widely used for dictation and home recording; however, the cylinder was a write-once medium, whereas the wire did offer the advantage of reuse. In the mid-1950s, magnetic tape emerged to become the ubiquitous recording medium. See magnetic tape.


An Ultra-Thin Recording Medium
By the 1940s, the 3" wire spools could record an hour of audio at 24 ips (top). The wire was manually threaded onto the takeup reel of this Webster-Chicago unit. Instructions in the manual show how two wires can be spliced together.


An Ultra-Thin Recording Medium
By the 1940s, the 3" wire spools could record an hour of audio at 24 ips (top). The wire was manually threaded onto the takeup reel of this Webster-Chicago unit. Instructions in the manual show how two wires can be spliced together.
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The sting lasted sixteen months, during which the government procured over 300 hours of informant-generated wire recordings, over 10,000 FISA intercepted wiretaps, created more than 300 surveillance logs cataloguing the movements of the men, and generated over 300 FBI 302s.
The mysterious wire recordings were delivered to the American university in 1967, and remained unheard for decades.
(3) Challenges on the analog side include difficulties created by the diverse formats that have served as carriers for recorded sound, such as the physical deterioration of open-reel tapes and wax cylinders, or the lack of broadly-available playback equipment for wire recordings and radio transcription discs.
tinny wire recordings converted to audio recordings" [p.
The condition of the collection's physical items was tracked using Indiana University's FACET software, an open source system for ranking the preservation needs of audio objects, ranging from cylinder and wire recordings to compact disks (available from www.dlib.indiana.edu/projects/sounddirections/facet/index.shtml).