WEP

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Related to Wired Equivalent Privacy: WPA

WEP

(Wired Equivalent Privacy) An IEEE standard security protocol for wireless 802.11 networks. Introduced in 1997, WEP was found to be very inadequate and was superseded by WPA, WPA2 and 802.11i. Its authentication method was extremely weak and even helped an attacker decipher the secret encryption key. As a result, WEP authentication was dropped from the Wi-Fi specification.

Passwords Are Required
WEP uses passwords that are entered manually at both ends (see preshared keys). Using the RC4 encryption algorithm, WEP originally specified a 40-bit key, but was later boosted to 104 bits. Combined with a 24-bit initialization vector, WEP is often touted as having a 128-bit key. See WPA, 802.11i and initialization vector.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Intended for experienced network architects and administrators, this guide describes the architecture of 802.11 wireless LANs, the media access control (MAC) layer, the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) protocol, management operations, the physical layers, and driver installation on Windows, Mac, and Linux.
The router supports two encryption protocols, Wireless Protected Access (WPA) and the older, less secure Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP).
The wireless network's encryption has been upgraded from Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) to WiFi Protected Access (WPA).
Many more are likely to have been using wired equivalent privacy (WEP), the bare minimum encryption for wireless networks that was cracked in 2001.
* Use 12B-bit wired equivalent privacy. A 128-bit key should be the baseline; anything less is child's play for a seasoned hacker.
-- Wireless LAN Security embedded in the TJ 855 integrates multiple layers of security, including Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) and 802.1x to provide security similar to that of a wired network.
Wired equivalent privacy (WEP) aims to provide security by encrypting data over radio waves so that it is protected during transmission.
Finally, the LT series is designed with enhanced multilevel security features such as an integrated lock slot, password protection to restrict unauthorized use, and WEP (wired equivalent privacy) encryption, which can be set at four different levels.
Set it at WEP (wired equivalent privacy), the most basic standard security mode, or if you are content with no security, select Disable.
All wireless connections can be secured using the WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) protocol for robust protection against unauthorized access.
This is an improvement over the older Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) technology, which hackers have been able to bypass.