witch-hunt

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witch-hunt

a rigorous campaign to round up or expose dissenters on the pretext of safeguarding the welfare of the public
References in periodicals archive ?
President Donald Trump (https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump) took to Twitter  Thursday, like he's done nearly every day since he was elected president, and this time he tweeted about a "witch hunt." The president claimed people were out to get him, saying that the country faced the greats hunt in American history, but Twitter users couldn't help but point that the Salem witch trials were actually the worst witch hunt, literally, in American history.
While there are inevitable conflicts of interpretation, many contributors agree that no one approach is sufficient to capture the complexities of witchcraft beliefs and the witch hunts. The essays also consider a variety of source material, including (among others) demonological treatises, folklore, pamphlets, and trial records.
There are many reasons behind witch hunts. According to Soma Chaudhuri, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, "Some of the more popular explanations are property disputes, epidemics and local politics that erupt into conflicts against local tribal women."
THE head of the Bank of England's regulatory body has denied a "witch hunt" against the financial sector as he defended its actions in tightening up rules.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- How could government yes-men do nothing when the prime minister of a country launches a witch hunt? Naturally, yes-men and low-caliber meddlers sprang up after the prime minister launched the witch hunt.
Author, Witchcraze: A New History of the European Witch Hunt
The European witch hunts took place during the approximately three hundred years from 1450 to 1750, an era historians usually call the early modern period.
Soma Chaudhuri spent seven months studying witch hunts in her native India and discovered that economic self-help groups have made it a part of their agenda to defend their fellow plantation workers against such hunts.
Witch-hunting in the duchy was generally managed in an orderly way from the top down, reaching a peak under the influence of Nicholas Remy, who became Charles Ill's Procureur-general in 1591-This phase of Lorraine's witch hunts, according to Monter, illustrates that European witch-hunting could be more widespread during periods of stable and responsible government and could function as a more or less normal form of law enforcement.
How do we make sense of the rise and fall of the early-modern European witch hunt? Standing farther back, one may ask: Were witch hunts unique to early-modern Europe and English North America?
Conference of Catholic Bishops, William Skylstad, wrote in his diocesan newspaper in October that "witch hunts and gay bashing have no place in the church."
In the late 1620s a wave of witch hunts swept across large areas of Germany.