witch-hunt

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witch-hunt

a rigorous campaign to round up or expose dissenters on the pretext of safeguarding the welfare of the public
References in periodicals archive ?
The Office of the President should step up and protect civil servants from witch-hunts and board members who put their personal interests above those of the public.
While the killings took place under different circumstances, several similarities are identified that problematize the enduring view that the witch-hunts were part of a national conspiracy targeted at the religious leaders of Nahdlatul Ulama (NU).
In the 1970s the association between women and witchcraft led to claims that the witch-hunts were a form of "gynocide," and witchcraft belief a tool used by patriarchy to control women.
And all the while, an invisible hand fed by hatred turns not only the country's prosecutors and judges but also companies like the Turkish Satellite Communications Company (TE-rksat) into critical instruments for its own witch-hunt. We all watch as the targeting of one specific social group turns into an outright hunt.
Witch-hunts like King's do nothing to increase security.
Modern day "witch-hunts" include the McCarthyist search for communists in the USA during the Cold War in 1953, though this was discredited partly by being compared to the Salem Witch trials of 1692, when 150 people in Massachusetts were accused of witchcraft, and 14 women and five men were hanged.
In what follows, I discuss the witch-hunts in Africa, examining their motivations and suggesting some initiatives that feminists can take to put an end to these persecutions.
(19) Wolfgang Behinger, Witches and Witch-Hunts: A Global history (Malden, MA: Polity Press, 2004); Ronald E.
Brian Levack's Witch-Hunting in Scotland, Law, Politics and Religion is an impressive book for both witchcraft scholars and interested general readers in that it offers a much needed comprehensive interpretation of Scottish witch-hunts that delves into the intersecting fields of Scottish politics, legal theory and religion.
In the "Origins of heartlessness: the culture and way of life of beggars in late seventeenth-century Salzburg," Schindler analyses one of the last major witch-hunts, the "Zauberjackl" trials in the Archbishopric of Salzburg (1675-90) that claimed hundreds of victims.
"We think we've got it right this time," undersecretary of Defense Bernard Rostker said, defending what he called an improvement to "don't ask, don't tell." "The days of witch-hunts, the days of stakeouts, are really gone."
Management witch-hunts contradict an order by Health Minister Sam Galbraith who last year lifted a "gagging" clause on NHS staff.