Wolf 359


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Wolf 359

[wu̇lf ¦thrē¦fif·tē′nīn]
(astronomy)
A star of absolute magnitude 16.6; it is 7.8 light-years from the sun and is a variable flare star, which may emit bursts of light and even radio noise.
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It displaces Wolf 359, which lies 7.8 light-years away.
The Leo constellation is also home to Wolf 359, the third closest star to our solar system after the alpha Centaurus group and Barnard's star situated 48' north of the star 56 Leonis.
It joins Alpha Centauri (4.4 light-years away), Barnard's Star (6.0 light-years), and Wolf 359 (7.8 light-years) as the nearest star systems to Earth and is the closest system discovered since 1916.
motion (l-y) Proxima Centauri Cen 11.0 3.85" 4.22 Alpha Centauri (A, B) Cen -0.3 * 3.71" 4.40 Barnard's Star Oph 9.5 10.36" 5.94 Wolf 359 Leo 13.5 4.70" 7.78 Teegarden's Star Ari 15.4 5.05" 8 ??
Among them are flare stars like UV Ceti or Wolf 359 in Leo, which exhibit unpredictable bursts of brightness amounting to several magnitudes, accompanied by enhanced emission lines in their spectra.
Wolf 359 is remarkably dim, magnitude 13.5, but Lalande 21185 is an easy binocular object at magnitude 7.5.
The next closest is Wolf 359 in Leo, magnitude 13.5.
But the star Wolf 359, or CN Leonis, is the third-closest stellar system to us and the least luminous star of all the millions visible in a medium-size telescope.
The next nearest star, Wolf 359 in Leo, is a real challenge at magnitude 13.5.