Wolof


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Wolof

(wōl`əf), black African ethnic group numbering over 3 million, along the Atlantic coast of W Africa; most live in Senegal, but there is a significant minority in Gambia. Traditional Wolof society was distinguished for its rigid social classes. There were nobles and farmers among the free born; below them were lower classes of artisans and minstrels; slaves were the lowest class. Chiefs were elected by the nobles. By the 14th cent. the Wolof had established a separate state. They were converted to Islam in the 18th cent.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Wolof

 

a people living mainly in the central maritime area of the Republic of Senegal from the left bank of the Senegal River to the city of Dakar. Some Wolofs live in the neighboring countries of Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, and Guinea. The total population is approximately 1.6 million (1967). They speak the Wolof language. Most of the Wolofs profess Islam, and a smaller number are Christians (Catholics). The material and spiritual culture of the Wolofs is similar to that of the Serer and other nearby peoples in Senegal. The chief occupation is tropical farming (peanuts, millet, and rice), and there is fishing along the coastal areas.


Wolof

 

one of the languages of the population in the Republic of Senegal and some regions of Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, and Guinea. There are approximately 1.6 million speakers of Wolof (1967). Wolof, which belongs to the Atlantic group of languages (Western Bantoid), is split up into the dialect areas of St.Louis, Kay or, Walo, Saloum, and Lebu. Long and short vowels are semantically distinguished, and there are many diphthongs. Vowels have high and low tones. Wolof has a complex system of noun classes. The initial consonants of other words in a sentence are in agreement with the initial vowel of the noun (class marker). Most roots are monosyllabic, and there is a rich system of affixes. There are more than 300 verbal suffixes for the expression of time, nature of action, and so forth. The first primer in the Wolof language was created in 1960.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jean-Boy needs to learn Wolof or Fulani if he ever plans on finding a suitable wife.
In the Wolof culture in Senegal, the word for the circumcised man (njulli) has the same origin as the word for prayer (julli).
He speaks French, Wolof and English, and insists there is no topic they can't break down in verse.
However, given our lack of semantics Original iconographic Wolof, we decided to have the cooperation of "Casa de Senegal" as the center with more visibility for Senegalese immigrant community in Madrid.
The teenager said: "Some of the languages that I speak, or I've studied, are French, Latin, ancient Greek, Mandarin, Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew, Arabic, Farsi, Pashto, Hindi, Indonesian, Wolof, Hausa, Swahili, isiXhosa, Ojibwe, Dutch, Italian."
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) explores the neglected corpus of Senegalese Sufi oral texts, particularly the Wolof Sufi texts, for what they reveal about Islam in Senegal.
More than the festival's other performers, perhaps, Ndiaye is uniquely adept at sharing Wolof cultural traditions with his audience, as well as his vision of his society and its unstoppable process of transformation.
The new languages announced are English UK, Punjabi (Pakistan), Sindhi (Pakistan), Central Kurdish (Iraq), Uyghur (People's Republic of China), Belarusian (Belarus), Kinyarwanda (Rwanda), Tigrinya (Ethiopia), Tajik (Tajikistan), Wolof (Senegal), K'iche' (Guatemala), Scottish Gaelic (United Kingdom), Cherokee (United States) and Valencian (Spain).