Women's Army Corps


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Women's Army Corps:

see WACWAC
(Women's Army Corps), U.S. army organization created (1942) during World War II to enlist women as auxiliaries for noncombatant duty in the U.S. army. Before 1943 it was known as the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC). Its first director was Oveta Culp Hobby.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Effective 20 October 1978, the Women's Army Corps was disestablished as a separate entity and women were finally integrated into the armed forces.
I think that's part of being a Soldier anyway, but being part of the Women's Army Corps makes it even tighter," Windisch added.
I SPENT the first weeks in that dark space, winding through reels of microfiched files on Canadian Women's Army Corps personnel diagnosed with VD.
Her next assignment was as a Recruiting Officer for the Women's Army Corps in New Hampshire.
But soon she was back in England, where she was sent to work with the Free French in Gloucester-shire and then the Canadian Women's Army Corps (CWACs), first in London and then in Paris, where her father was ambassador.
Evelyn Fraser was a public-information officer for the Women's Army Corps.
Colonel Carroll attended military specialty schools including the Women's Army Corps Officer Basic Course, the Military Police Basic and Advanced Course, the Armed Forces Staff College, and the Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management.
Major desktop lexicons concur with the American Heritage 4th definition of noun acronym: "A word formed from the initial letters of a name, such as WAG for Women's Army Corps or by combining initial letters of a series of words such as radar for radio detecting and ranging.
When war broke out again in 1939, she accepted an appointment as matron-in-chief of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and helped organize the Canadian Women's Army Corps, better known as CWAC.
A fascinating archival dig, "Lessons" draws on clips as far back as film's infancy, traipsing further through "naturalist" nudies, newsreels, women's sports footage (including a Leni Riefenstahl excerpt), WWII Women's Army Corps glimpses, classroom sex ed pics, "girl-on-girl" stag reels, Poverty Row melodramas, upscale '62 lesbian angst drama "The Children's Hour" (with Shirley MacLaine sobbing out her "disgusting" love for fellow school-marm Audrey Hepburn), Harlem Renaissance documentation, actual "dyke bar" police busts, antique commercials and so forth.
Fifty-plus years ago, seeking to establish a legitimate role for women in the military, the leaders of the Women's Army Corps felt compelled to debate whether women could appropriately wear trousers.
POW's, the Women's Army Corps, and the army's often overlooked role in developing the first atomic bombs.

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