nun

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nun:

see monasticismmonasticism
, form of religious life, usually conducted in a community under a common rule. Monastic life is bound by ascetical practices expressed typically in the vows of celibacy, poverty, and obedience, called the evangelical counsels.
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Nun

(nŭn, no͞on), in the Bible, father of Joshua.

Nun

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Nun is a term used to describe a woman who has professed vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience within the Roman Catholic tradition. Technically it applies to women living in a cloistered community, but it is now often used to refer to religious women active in ministry to the world. The more traditional term for such women is "sister." Orders for women were established by Saints Basil, Benedict, Augustine, and Francis. Today nuns carry out much of the behind-the-scenes work of education and ministering to the sick and needy.

What does it mean when you dream about a nun?

Graduates of parochial schools have numerous associations with nuns that go beyond the scope of this book. Otherwise, nuns can represent everything from spirituality to religious authority to sexual repression.

nun

1
1. a female member of a religious order
2. a variety of domestic fancy pigeon usually having a black-and-white plumage with a ridged peak or cowl of short white feathers

nun

2
the 14th letter in the Hebrew alphabet (נ or, at the end of a word, ן), transliterated as n
References in periodicals archive ?
Other fabrics in the work, including those used for the nuns' habits and the bed coverings at the upper right, suggest the production of cloth, an additional expectation of the reform and a traditional aspect of women's monasticism.
Indexed, for both France and England, a lack of reference to earlier material leads to a discussion of the tenth-century foundations in vacuo, as though there was no inherited vision of what constitutes women's monasticism, and no established national pride in female monastic figures.
Nevertheless, even if the book does leave some questions unanswered, which is to a great extent justifiable given the vast scope of the enterprise, it creates the necessary substrate that will enable future studies to expand upon the issue of women's monasticism.

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