Seven Wonders of the World

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Seven Wonders of the World

Seven Wonders of the World, in ancient classifications, were the Great Pyramid of Khufu (see pyramid) or all the pyramids with or without the sphinx; the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, with or without the walls; the mausoleum at Halicarnassus; the Artemision at Ephesus; the Colossus of Rhodes; the Olympian Zeus, statue by Phidias; and the lighthouse at Pharos, Alexandria, or, instead, the walls of Babylon.

Bibliography

See L. Cottrell, Wonders of the World (1959).

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seven Wonders of the World

 

from the point of view of antiquity, the most famous sights of the ancient world. Of the seven diverse monuments, the pyramids of Egypt alone are almost intact. Some monuments are known from fragments, for example, the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus (built 356 B.C. after a fire destroyed an earlier, smaller structure; destroyed by Goths A.D. 262) and the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (built after 353 B.C.). Others are known from the writings of ancient authors, for example, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon (sixth century B.C.), the Statue of Zeus at Olympia (gold and ivory, c. 430 B.C., sculptor Phidias), the Colossus of Rhodes (a statue of the god Helios; bronze, c. 292–280 B.C., sculptor Chares of Lin-dus), and the Pharos of Alexandria (c. 280 B.C., architect Sostra-tus of Cnidus).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Seven Wonders of the World

The seven most remarkable structures of ancient times: pyramids at El Gizeh, the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Colossus at Rhodes, statue of Zeus at Olympia, and the lighthouse at Alexandria; of these, only the pyramids at El Gizeh remain.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.