Wood shingle


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Wood shingle

A roofing unit of wood that is cut to stock dimensions and thicknesses and used as an overlapping covering over sloping roofs and side walls.

wood shingle

A thin roofing unit of wood, usually cut from green wood and then kiln-dried, either split along the grain or cut to stock lengths, widths, and thicknesses; used as an exterior covering on sloping roofs and on side walls and applied in an overlapping fashion. Also see shingle.
References in periodicals archive ?
You look at fiber cement board for siding versus wood shingle. You look at dual-pane tempered glass windows versus a single pane.
Members previously proposed installing a historically accurate wood shingle roof but may have to plan for a less expensive alternative.
An updated BIA study, developed by RSMeans, compares the installed cost of total house construction for brick veneer over wood framing with the cost of adhered manufactured stone, stucco, wood shingle, plus vinyl, fiber cement or horizontal wood siding alternatives.
Forest Products Laboratory, a wood shingle roof like this one photographed at at the Silver Saddle Motel in Boulder, Colo.
The 3,900-square-foot building is built of natural materials, including bark-on Atlantic White Cedar siding and columns complemented by stained natural edge siding and wood shingle roof and local stone.
For wood shingle roofs, purlins should be solid for the first three courses at the bottom and the outer 1 foot at the rakes (Figure 31-19).
Cross the opposite lane and climb the hill to the lovely little church with its wood shingle bellcot.
Both "slate and tile" and "wood shingle" roofs are associated with far more valuable homes than "asphalt shingle" roofs ($115,824 and $87,227, respectively).
This summer, the pair have commissioned an elegant tower constructed in the ancient way from solid oak beams with wood shingle roof tiles, which will be a peaceful eerie with views all around.
Another environmentally friendly wood shingle is produced by Maibec Industries (www.maibec.com)in eastern Canada.
To hold big bouquets as shown below, wire blocks of florist's foam to the trellis's top right corner and lower left stake; to help keep wire from cutting into foam, put a piece of cardboard or wood shingle between foam and stake.