wood engraving

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wood engraving

[′wu̇d in‚grāv·iŋ]
(graphic arts)
An engraving carved on the edge grain of a piece of wood.
References in periodicals archive ?
I know that Gill's working drawing for his wood-engraving of a nude in the bath is dated within days of the diary entry for his sexual abuse of his daughters.
wood-engraving, elevating the art form both aesthetically and commercially.
From a technological point of view, it demonstrated British superiority in the art of wood-engraving and book binding.
Separate chapters are devoted to the Society's sponsorship of the revival of English gem-engraving and to wood-engraving. By drafting and redrafting the premiums for the latter the Society engaged with the problems of how best to encourage the process.
Gill was a powerful mentor in Jones's early days, instilling in him the crucial principle that art must 'proceed from the known', and encouraging him to take up carpentry (in which he was inept) and wood-engraving (in which he would soon achieve works of great authority and inventiveness).
Wood-engraving was Leighton's principle medium, and she was well known on both sides of the Atlantic for her prints, produced both as independent art works and as illustrations for books.
Another major advance was the greatly expanded use of illustration, which employed a variety of refined or newly introduced technologies, including wood-engraving, electroplate copperplate engravings, lithography (resulting in highly-colored illustrations), and photography.
For most bibliophiles, wood-engraving is associated with one name: Thomas Bewick.
(30) Unlike the illustrations of Burns that were published by Catnach and Davison, Stothard first furnished designs for copper-engraved plates, and it was only for the second edition for which Luke Clennell furnished the wood-engravings, that the new engraving medium was used.
Of special interest are the many sketches, photographs, and wood-engravings. The latter were often (but not always) based upon photographs since given the technology of the time, photographs could be reproduced in newspapers only after they had been engraved onto wood.
Needless to say, only a small fraction of these are actually portraits of Palestrina himself, though the range here is wide, stretching from the 16th century to Arnaldo Zocchi's monument in the town of Palestrina itself and anonymous 20th-century wood-engravings, testimony to the persistence and continuity of the process of mythologizing.